Nonvoluntary Psychiatric Treatment Is Distinct From Involuntary Psychiatric Treatment

JAMA. 2017; 318(11): 999-1000.
Author: Dominic A. Sisti
“Some of the most ethically challenging cases in mental health care involve providing treatment to individuals who refuse that treatment. Sometimes when persons with mental illness become unsafe to themselves or others, they must be taken, despite their outward and often vigorous refusal, to an emergency department or psychiatric hospital to receive treatment, such as stabilizing psychotropic medication. On occasion, to provide medical care over objection, a patient must be physically restrained.”
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Call for change to human cloning law to prevent genetic disorder

SMH, 21 September 2017
Authors: Aisha Dow, Melissa Cunningham
“A procedure to create “three-person babies” could be on its way to Australia, with a campaign launched to overhaul a law on human cloning in an attempt to prevent babies from suffering a severe genetic disorder.”
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The United Kingdom Sets Limits on Experimental Treatments: The Case of Charlie Gard

JAMA. 2017;318(11):1001-1002
Author: Robert D. Truog
“The case of Charlie Gard in London, England, has been the focus of international attention, generating polarized views about the use of experimental treatments. On one side are those who hold that patients should be able to purchase whatever treatments they desire and can afford; on the other are those who maintain that governments must play a regulatory role in protecting patients from harm and that unproven therapies must meet a threshold of scientific validity before they are offered, regardless of the ability of the patient to pay.”
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‘Shocking’ disregard for safety in U.S. meningitis case -prosecutor

Reuters, 21 September 2017
Author: Nate Raymond
“A federal prosecutor on Tuesday accused a Massachusetts pharmacist charged with murder for his role in a deadly 2012 U.S. meningitis outbreak of showing a “shocking” disregard for patients’ lives, while his lawyer argued the man was no killer.”
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The ethical basis for performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation only after informed consent in selected patient groups admitted to hospital

Clinical Ethics, 12(3), 111-116
Authors: Philip Berry, Iona Heath
“Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is frequently performed on patients who, in retrospect, had a very low chance of survival. This is because all patients are ‘For cardiopulmonary resuscitation’ on admission to hospital by default, and delays occur before cardiopulmonary resuscitation can be ‘de-prescribed’. This article reviews the nature of potential harms caused by futile cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the reasons why de-prescription may be delayed, recent legal judgements relevant to timely do not attempt cardiopulmonary resuscitation decision making, and the possible detrimental effects of do not attempt cardiopulmonary resuscitation discussions on end of life care.”
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Health Care Complaints Commission v De Saxe [2017] NSWCATOD 135

Decision date: 12 September 2017
“Medical Practitioner: practitioner engaging in sexual conduct with patients – practitioner prescribing inappropriately for patient – practitioner prescribing for self-medication – practitioner failing to maintain proper records – practitioner failing to communicate with other treating specialists of patient – complaints of unsatisfactory professional conduct constituting professional misconduct established.”
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Informed consent and registry-based research – the case of the Danish circumcision registry

BMC Medical Ethics 2017 18:53
Authors: Thomas Ploug, Søren Holm
“Research into personal health data holds great potential not only for improved treatment but also for economic growth. In these years many countries are developing policies aimed at facilitating such research often under the banner of ‘big data’. A central point of debate is whether the secondary use of health data requires informed consent if the data is anonymised.”
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