Vaginal mesh scandal: women don’t need body-shaming on top of their pain

The Guardian, 1 October 2017
Author: Barbara Ellen
“The ongoing vaginal mesh implant scandal is a complex affair, with group lawsuits erupting all around the world, including the US, the UK and Australia. Last week, Johnson & Johnson’s Ethicon unit was ordered to pay a record $57m in damages to a woman called Ella Ebaugh. The J&J implant, launched without a clinical trial, is still marketed, often in cases involving traumatic births, years after it was known to cause appalling problems to women such as Ebaugh, including intense pelvic pain and torn bladders and vaginas, leading to agonising sex and incontinence.”
Find article here.

Knowles v Pharmacy Council of NSW

Decision date: 25 September 2017
“CIVIL AND ADMINISTRATIVE TRIBUNAL – Occupational Division – Stay – additional principle in NSW – protection of health and safety of the public the paramount consideration. In the January 2017 Decision, the Council found that, given a lack of adherence to accepted guidelines and the lack of substantive evidence about the safety and efficacy of certain drugs in humans, the applicant’s practice in relation to the dispensing of peptides was not within accepted standards nor compliant with the Pharmacy Board of Australia (PBA)’s Guidelines on Compounding Medicines (the PBA Guidelines) or otherwise met the public interest.”
Find decision here.

The United Kingdom Sets Limits on Experimental Treatments: The Case of Charlie Gard

JAMA. 2017;318(11):1001-1002
Author: Robert D. Truog
“The case of Charlie Gard in London, England, has been the focus of international attention, generating polarized views about the use of experimental treatments. On one side are those who hold that patients should be able to purchase whatever treatments they desire and can afford; on the other are those who maintain that governments must play a regulatory role in protecting patients from harm and that unproven therapies must meet a threshold of scientific validity before they are offered, regardless of the ability of the patient to pay.”
Find article here.

‘Shocking’ disregard for safety in U.S. meningitis case -prosecutor

Reuters, 21 September 2017
Author: Nate Raymond
“A federal prosecutor on Tuesday accused a Massachusetts pharmacist charged with murder for his role in a deadly 2012 U.S. meningitis outbreak of showing a “shocking” disregard for patients’ lives, while his lawyer argued the man was no killer.”
Find article here.

Suicide and self-harm in prisons hit worst ever levels

The Guardian, 29 June 2017
Author: Rajeev Syal
“Prisons have “struggled to cope” with record rates of suicide and self-harm among inmates following cuts to funding and staff numbers, the public spending watchdog has said. The National Audit Office said it remains unclear how the authorities will meet aims for improving prisoners’ mental health or get value for money because of a lack of relevant data. Auditors said that self-harm incidents increased by 73% between 2012 and 2016 to 40,161, while the 120 self-inflicted deaths in prison in 2016 was the highest figure on record and almost double that for 2012.”
Find article here.