Undocumented 17-Year-Old Must Delay Abortion, Court Rules

NYT, 21 October 2017
Author: Christina Caron
“An undocumented 17-year-old caught in a legal standoff with the federal government must further delay plans for an abortion after an appeals court ruled on Friday that the Department of Health and Human Services had 11 days to find a sponsor to take custody of the teenager.”
Find article here.

Corruption Poses Critical Challenge to Global Health Efforts

JAMA. 2017;318(15):1431.
Author: M.J. Friedrich
“This article explores the scope and variety of fraudulent conduct in health services and discusses emerging anticorruption tools and interagency frameworks that could limit corruption. Data and technology can play a big role in improving transparency and accountability. Online social network platforms can be used as educational tools to increase public awareness about corruption as well as to increase citizen participation in monitoring and reporting of corruption. Efforts aimed at analysis and mining of large reimbursement data sets can also detect health care fraud.”
Find article here.

Oregon’s Death With Dignity Act: 20 Years of Experience to Inform the Debate

Ann Intern Med. 2017;167(8):579-583.
Authors: Katrina Hedberg, Craig New
“Twenty years ago, Oregon voters approved the Death With Dignity Act, making Oregon the first state in the United States to allow physicians to prescribe medications to be self-administered by terminally ill patients to hasten their death. This report summarizes the experience in Oregon, including the numbers and types of participating patients and providers. These data should inform the ongoing policy debate as additional jurisdictions consider such legislation.”
Find article here.

 

Ethics and the Legalization of Physician-Assisted Suicide: An American College of Physicians Position Paper

Ann Intern Med. 2017;167(8):576-578.
Authors: Lois Snyder Sulmasy, Paul S. Mueller; for the Ethics, Professionalism and Human Rights Committee of the American College of Physicians
“Calls to legalize physician-assisted suicide have increased and public interest in the subject has grown in recent years despite ethical prohibitions. Many people have concerns about how they will die and the emphasis by medicine and society on intervention and cure has sometimes come at the expense of good end-of-life care. Some have advocated strongly, on the basis of autonomy, that physician-assisted suicide should be a legal option at the end of life. As a proponent of patient-centered care, the American College of Physicians (ACP) is attentive to all voices, including those who speak of the desire to control when and how life will end. However, the ACP believes that the ethical arguments against legalizing physician-assisted suicide remain the most compelling.”
Find position paper here.

Increase in abuse and neglect in mental health and disability facilities

SMH, 19 October 2017
Author: Miki Perkins
“In one home for people with disabilities, toilet paper was rationed. In another, a resident was left in the garden for two hours on a roasting hot day. He had to be taken to hospital for exposure and sunburn. These are just two examples among hundreds of incidents of abuse, neglect and violence reported by community visitors – volunteer advocates who visit the state’s mental health and disability facilities to check on the welfare of residents.”
Find article here.

Victorian woman fined $20,000 for posing as a psychologist and a general practitioner

Medical Board of Australia, 10 October 2017
“A court has fined a Victorian woman $20,000 without conviction and ordered her to pay $10,000 in costs for holding out as a psychologist and as a general practitioner. It followed her treatment of patients as a psychologist while not registered to do so under the National Law.”
Find report here.

Pere v Central Queensland Hospital and Health Service [2017] QCA 225

Decision date: 6 October 2017
“PROFESSIONS AND TRADES – HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONALS – MEDICAL PRACTITIONERS – LIABILITY IN TORT – GENERAL PRINCIPLES – where the applicant was employed by the respondent – where the applicant was acting unusually while at work – where a co-worker escorted the applicant to the Emergency Department – where medical staff believed the applicant to be either under the influence of alcohol or illicit drugs, or suffering from a medical condition that would require urgent attention – where a doctor discussed the taking of blood and urine samples with the applicant – where the hospital staff reported the applicant was calm and co-operative and that consent was obtained prior to the taking of the samples – where the applicant claims no consent was given…’.
Find decision here.

Newly controversial opioid enforcement law under fire

The Hill, 17 October 2017
Author: Rachel Roubein
“Several lawmakers are pushing to repeal or revisit a law critics say enables the flow of deadly and addictive opioids, hours after President Trump’s drug czar nominee withdrew his name amid the controversy.”
Find article here.

Australian-first with corporation fined $127,500 for unlawful advertising

AHPRA, 4 October 2017
“In an Australian-first, Wellness Enterprises Pty Limited, which traded as Australian Male Hormone Clinic, has been fined $127,500 plus costs after being found guilty and convicted of 17 charges related to unlawful advertising of regulated health services.”
Find article here.