U.S. appeals court strikes down Florida law in ‘Docs vs. Glocks’ case

Reuters, 16 February 2017
Author: Brendan Pierson
“A U.S. appeals court on Thursday struck down a Florida law that barred doctors from asking patients about gun ownership, ruling that the law violated doctors’ right to free speech. The decision, from the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Atlanta, reverses an earlier decision in the so-called “Docs v. Glocks” case by a three-judge panel of that court upholding the law.”
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Mistakes at U.S. lab force hundreds of Zika tests to be repeated

Reuters, 17 February 2017
Author: Julie Steenhuysen
“Officials in Washington, D.C.’s public health laboratory had to repeat Zika tests for nearly 300 pregnant women, including two women who were mistakenly told they tested negative for the mosquito-borne virus that has been shown to cause birth defects.”
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UnitedHealth sued by U.S. government over Medicare charges

Reuters, 17 February 2017
Author: Akankshita Mukhopadhyay, Laharee Chatterjee
“The U.S. Justice Department has joined a whistleblower lawsuit against UnitedHealth Group Inc that claims the country’s largest health insurer and its units and affiliates overcharged Medicare hundreds of millions of dollars, a law firm representing the whistleblower said on Thursday.”
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Calwell woman settles lawsuit against Canberra Hospital, doctors for $12m

SMH, 13 February 2017
Author: Alexandra Back
“A Calwell woman who was suing the Canberra Hospital and two doctors over alleged failures stemming from migraine drug treatment has settled the case for $12 million. It had been alleged that as a result of the alleged failures, Stacey Louise Cave, 40, suffered a stroke and brain damage, and was left dependent on a wheelchair.”
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ACT Health Minister announces data collection review after concerns about accuracy

SMH, 14 February 2017
Author: Katie Burgess
“The accuracy of ACT Health’s performance figures are again under scrutiny, more than five years after an employee was stood down for doctoring emergency service data. ACT health minister Meegan Fitzharris has ordered an urgent review into ACT Health’s data collection after the department failed to provide figures on its emergency department to the Productivity Commission for its annual comparison of the performance of states and territories.”
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Making headway against low value services

MJA Insight, 13 February 2017
Author: Nicole Mackee
“The push to address the use of low value, or potentially harmful, medical services is continuing to gain pace in Australia, say experts, after the Lancet published an article describing the overuse of medical services worldwide. Professor Adam Elshaug, professor of Health Policy at the University of Sydney, codirector of the Menzies Centre for Health Policy and a coleader of a Lancet series, Right Care, said Australia‚Äôs clinical community had pulled together to drive initiatives aimed at tackling inappropriate care.”
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Sen. Grassley Launches Inquiry Into Orphan Drug Law’s Effect On Prices

NPR, 10 February 2017
Author: Sarah Jane Tribble
“Republican Sen. Chuck Grassley, chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, has opened an inquiry into potential abuses of the Orphan Drug Act that may have contributed to high prices on commonly used drugs.”
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