Guam abortion reporting requirements may conflict with federal privacy laws

PacificDailyNews, 27 June 2017
Author: Haidee V Eugenio
“A law passed late last year toughens mandatory reporting requirements for abortions on Guam, but the Department of Public Health and Social Services has not verified whether the requirements are being followed, citing a possible conflict with federal medical privacy laws. The federal law includes a privacy provision that limits the disclosure of patient information without the patient’s approval.”
Find article here.

Joint United Nations statement on ending discrimination in health care settings

WHO, 27 June 2017
Source: World Health Organization
“United Nations entities recall that a central principle of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development is to “ensure that no one is left behind” and to “reach the furthest behind first”. Recognizing that discrimination in health care settings is a major barrier to the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), United Nations entities commit to working together to support Member States in taking coordinated multisectoral action to eliminate discrimination in health care settings. Discrimination in health care settings is widespread across the world and takes many forms. It violates the most fundamental human rights protected in international treaties and in national laws and constitutions.”
Find article here.

A health issue, not a crime: it’s time to scrap outdated abortion laws

The Guardian, 25 June 2017
Author: Caroline de Costa Heather Douglas
“On Wednesday the Queensland law reform commission (QLRC) received a reference to consider how Queensland should amend laws relating to termination of pregnancy and remove abortion offences from the criminal code. The QLRC has 12 months to report on how to repeal these archaic Queensland laws dating back to 1861.”
Find article here.

 

Euthanasia survey hints at support from doctors, nurses and division

SMH, 24 June 2017
Author: James Robertson
“Most NSW doctors and nurses support a controversial medical euthanasia bill headed for Parliament, according to research that could prompt new debate about the medical fraternity’s willingness to accept changes to assisted suicide laws.”
Find article here.

Regina v Graeme Stephen Reeves

Unlawful killing charge regarding medical treatment: Acquital, 16 June 2017
“Generally, the Crown case is that the accused was grossly negligent in that, during the time that Mrs McAllister was under his care, the accused failed to appropriately physically examine her, that he failed to reconsider his diagnosis of viral illness, that he failed to order exclusionary tests for bacterial infection, including blood tests and vaginal swabs, and that he failed to order the commencement of precautionary antibiotic treatment.”
Find summary here, provided by Bill Madden 19 June 2017.