1 in 10 medical products in developing countries is substandard or falsified

WHO, 28 November 2017
Source: WHO Media Centre
“An estimated 1 in 10 medical products circulating in low- and middle-income countries is either substandard or falsified, according to new research from WHO. This means that people are taking medicines that fail to treat or prevent disease. Not only is this a waste of money for individuals and health systems that purchase these products, but substandard or falsified medical products can cause serious illness or even death.”
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An open letter to the Australian Parliament regarding the health of asylum seekers and refugees on Manus Island

MJA Insight, 27 November 2017
Author: David Watters et al.
“We are senior Australian clinicians who write in our individual capacity to express our concerns about the ongoing health and well-being of the former detainees still based on Manus Island and now in alternative accommodation. They, like all human beings, have a universal right – enshrined in the United Nations charter – to health and well-being. Their political and citizenship status should not affect this right. All politicians regardless of their political party should respect the human right to health and themselves be strong advocates of “health for all” without discrimination.”
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Why Tobacco Companies Are Paying to Tell You Smoking Kills

NYT, 24 November 2017
Author: Sapna Maheshwari
“The messages stem from a lawsuit brought by the Justice Department in 1999. As part of the 2006 ruling in the suit, which sought to punish cigarette makers for decades of deceiving the public about the dangers of their product, the companies were ordered to disseminate “corrective statements” centered on the health risks and addictive nature of smoking. But until now, they resisted through appeals and by wrangling over wording.”
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Emergency Legal Authority and the Opioid Crisis

NEJM Perspective, 15 November 2017
Authors: Lainie Rutkow, Jon S. Vernick
“Recently, six states have taken the unusual step of using their legal authority to declare their opioid-overdose situation an emergency. When a government issues an emergency declaration, it can temporarily act to mitigate the emergency using powers and resources that might not otherwise be available to it. Typically, emergency declarations pertain to natural disasters or infectious disease outbreaks. The severity of the opioid-overdose crisis has led to some of the first emergency declarations for a noncommunicable health condition, though their impact remains unclear.”
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Australia urged to sue Big Tobacco for past healthcare costs

SMH, 20 November 2017
Authors: Steve Lillebuen, Neelima Choahan
“Australia should consider suing Big Tobacco to recover the tens of billions spent each year on smoking-related illnesses, health researchers say. More than $30 billion is estimated to be spent each year on the health, social and economic costs related to smoking as one of the country’s preventable causes of death.”
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What If We Treated Gun Violence Like A Public Health Crisis?

NPR, 15 November 2017
Author: Alison Kodjak
“More than 30,000 people are killed with guns in the U.S. every year. That’s more than die of AIDS, and about the same number as die in car crashes or from liver disease. But unlike AIDS or car crashes, the government doesn’t treat gun injuries or deaths as a public health threat.”
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Investor group warns U.S. farm antibiotic policy lagging

Reuters, 15 November 2017
Author: Lisa Baertlein
“The United States is falling behind Europe in the fight to curb the overuse and misuse of antibiotics in meat production and experts are warning of the possibility of dangerous drug-resistant “superbug” infections as a result, according to a new report on Tuesday. The World Health Organization (WHO) says the farm sector consumes around 80 percent of all medically important antibiotics in some countries.”
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The evolution of public health ethics frameworks: systematic review of moral values and norms in public health policy

Med Health Care and Philos, 2017, 1-16
Authors: Mahmoud Abbasi, Reza Majdzadeh, Alireza Zali, et al.
“Given the evolution of the public health (PH) and the changes from the phenomenon of globalization, this area has encountered new ethical challenges. In order to find a coherent approach to address ethical issues in PH policy, this study aimed to identify the evolution of public health ethics (PHE) frameworks and the main moral values and norms in PH practice and policy.”
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Full statutory inquiry to be held into tainted blood scandal

The Guardian, 4 November 2017
Author: Peter Walker
“An inquiry into how contaminated blood transfusions infected thousands of people with hepatitis C and HIV has been moved from the Department of Health to the Cabinet Office after pressure from families, Downing Street has announced. The inquiry, ordered in July after years of pressure from MPs and campaign groups, will be held as a statutory public inquiry under the 2005 Inquiries Act, Theresa May’s spokesman said.”
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