Why health services research needs bioethics

Journal of Medical Ethics 2017; 43: 655-656.
Author: Lucy Frith
“Health services research brings together a wide variety of disciplines and would seem ideally placed to include ethics. However, if you search health services research journals and conference programmes there is very little consideration of ethics as a substantive topic and often scant attention paid to the ethical issues that might be raised by an intervention or policy. Ethics and ethical issues are generally confined to discussions over priority setting, and occasionally health technology assessment, with other areas of health service research seldom engaging in ethical debate.”
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Vaginal mesh scandal: women don’t need body-shaming on top of their pain

The Guardian, 1 October 2017
Author: Barbara Ellen
“The ongoing vaginal mesh implant scandal is a complex affair, with group lawsuits erupting all around the world, including the US, the UK and Australia. Last week, Johnson & Johnson’s Ethicon unit was ordered to pay a record $57m in damages to a woman called Ella Ebaugh. The J&J implant, launched without a clinical trial, is still marketed, often in cases involving traumatic births, years after it was known to cause appalling problems to women such as Ebaugh, including intense pelvic pain and torn bladders and vaginas, leading to agonising sex and incontinence.”
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Mother who refuses to follow court order to vaccinate son: ‘Most likely, I’ll be going to jail’

SMH, 30 September 2017
Author: Kristine Phillips
“The American Medical Association has long decried allowing parents to decline vaccination for nonmedical reasons and has cited vaccines’ ability to prevent diseases such as measles, mumps and other infectious diseases. Still, a majority of states allow religious exemptions for vaccinations. Nearly 20, including Michigan, provide exemption for religious and personal reasons. Only three, California, Mississippi and West Virginia, don’t allow nonmedical exemptions.”
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Knowles v Pharmacy Council of NSW

Decision date: 25 September 2017
“CIVIL AND ADMINISTRATIVE TRIBUNAL – Occupational Division – Stay – additional principle in NSW – protection of health and safety of the public the paramount consideration. In the January 2017 Decision, the Council found that, given a lack of adherence to accepted guidelines and the lack of substantive evidence about the safety and efficacy of certain drugs in humans, the applicant’s practice in relation to the dispensing of peptides was not within accepted standards nor compliant with the Pharmacy Board of Australia (PBA)’s Guidelines on Compounding Medicines (the PBA Guidelines) or otherwise met the public interest.”
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The Role of Courts in Shaping Health Equity

Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law 2017, 42(5): 749-770
Author: Mark A Hall
“Over the past fifty years, courts have played a limited, yet key, role in shaping health equity in the United States in three areas of law: racial discrimination, disability discrimination, and constitutional rights. In this article, I examine in various ways the roads courts have taken, the roads not taken, and possible future paths.”
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Current state of genomic policies in healthcare among EU member states: results of a survey of chief medical officers

European Journal of Public Health, 27(5), 2017, 931–937
Authors: W. Mazzucco R. Pastorino T. Lagerberg et al.
“A need for a governance of genomics in healthcare among European Union (EU) countries arose during an international meeting of experts on public health genomics (PHG). We have conducted a survey on existing national genomic policies in healthcare among Chief Medical Officers (CMOs) of the 28 EU member states, plus Norway.”
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Too many children exposed to unnecessary X-rays, Choosing Wisely experts tell doctors

SMH, 25 September 2017
Author: Kate Aubusson
“Unfortunately what we see is that so many of these children that come in to emergency departments with breathing problems and are having chest X-rays that doesn’t really change the treatment that we offer but it does put them at risk of the radiation that is associated with the X-ray and that is what we are trying to stop,” Dr Dalton said.”
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