Microneedle Patches for Flu Vaccination Successful in First Human Clinical Trial

Georgia Tech, 27 June 2017
Author: John Toon
“Despite the potentially severe consequences of illness and even death, only about 40 percent of adults in the United States receive flu shots each year; however, researchers believe a new self-administered, painless vaccine skin patch containing microscopic needles could significantly increase the number of people who get vaccinated. A phase I clinical trial found that influenza vaccination using Band-Aid-like patches with dissolvable microneedles was just as effective in generating immunity against influenza. The microneedle patch vaccine could also save money because it is easily self-administered, could be transported and stored without refrigeration, and is easily disposed of after use without sharps waste.”
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Preventing The Spread Of HIV With One Simple Gadget

Forbes, 28 June 2017
Author: Lee Bell
“In 2007, the World Health Organization (WHO) and UNAIDS cited that Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision can reduce the risk of HIV infection by approximately 60 percent in high risk areas such as Sub Saharan Africa. So to save millions of lives and billions of dollars in long-term HIV/AIDS healthcare costs, UNAIDS is leading a campaign that involves the circumcision of 27 million men. But how do you get million so men to willingly opt into such a personal and potentially dangerous procedure? You invent a device that makes it easy, painless and cheap.”
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A quarter of kidney donors are living: what you need to know to be a donor

The Conversation, 19 June 2017
Author: Holly Hutton
“At any one time, more than 1,400 Australians are on an organ transplant waiting list. The most common organs in demand are kidneys, followed by the liver and lung. While the number of deceased organ donors in Australia has doubled since 2009, rates of live donor transplantation – where a person donates one kidney or, rarely, a portion of their liver – are relatively static. The Australian government gives A$4.1 million to run the Supporting Living Organ Donors program. This scheme includes reimbursing employers for sick leave for those who donate an organ, as well as other initiatives that aim to remove financial barriers to organ donation.”
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FDA moves to prevent Pharma from ‘gaming’ generic drug system

Reuters, 21 June 2017
Author: Toni Clarke
“The U.S. Food and Drug Administration moved on Wednesday to prevent pharmaceutical companies from “gaming” the system to block or delay entry of generic rivals. FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb said in a blog post that the agency plans to hold a public meeting on July 18 to identify ways pharmaceutical companies are using FDA rules to place obstacles in the way of generic competition. The move comes as the President and lawmakers in Congress search for ways to lower the cost of prescription drugs.”
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A Clinic Mix-Up Leaves Pregnant Woman In Dark About Zika Risk

KHN, 21 June 2017
Author: Jonel Aleccia
“Hospital officials in Washington state have apologized after failing for months to inform a pregnant woman she was likely infected with the Zika virus that can cause devastating birth defects. Andrea Pardo was tested for the virus in October, after becoming pregnant while living in Mexico. The results were ready by December, but she wasn’t notified until April just before she delivered her daughter. The delay, blamed on a mistake at the University of Washington clinic where Pardo received care, deprived her of the chance to make an informed choice about her pregnancy.”
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Doctors lack training in medical ethics: DAK

Brighterkashmir, 20 June 2017
Source: Brighter Kashmir
“Doctors Association Kashmir (DAK) today said that doctors in Kashmir lack training in medical ethics. Describing it as an essential component of patient care, President DAK Dr Nisar ul Hassan in a statement said that doctors are not taught medical ethics during their training. Medical ethics are moral principles in the practice of medicine to which a physician has an obligation. But this need is often not met.”
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Public Health ordered to use gender-neutral terms

The Guam Daily Post, 16 June 2017
Author: John O’Connor
“The Department of Public Health and Social Services has been ordered by the Superior Court of Guam to update its record system and forms, including birth certificates, so that they are gender neutral. The department will have 30 days from May 31 to enact the changes and will make gender-neutral birth certificates available to same-sex parents who did not receive certificates correctly identifying both of them in the past.”
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Why using AI in healthcare requires a balance of efficiency and ethics

Information Management, 16 June 2017
Author: Michael Breggar
“Along with predicting epidemics, diagnosing diseases and counseling patients, artificial intelligence is also proving its worth in healthcare delivery to enable a better patient experience. From making sense of the unwieldy mass of medical data trapped in healthcare systems to tapping into the collective knowledge gathered from several thousand healthcare providers and millions of patient visits, doctors can now start to analyze which treatments work best and when.”
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