Minors, Moral Psychology, and the Harm Reduction Debate: The Case of Tobacco and Nicotine

Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law 2017, 42(6): 1099-1112
Author: Lynn T. Kozlowski
“Harm reduction debates are important in health policy. Although it has been established that morality affects policy, this article proposes that perspectives from moral psychology help to explain the challenges of developing evidence-based policy on prohibition-only versus tobacco/nicotine harm reduction for minors.”
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Australia’s health watchdog accused of ‘too close’ relationship with industry

SMH, 5 November 2017
Author: Joanne McCarthy
“Australia’s drug and medical device watchdog, the Therapeutic Goods Administration, needs a complete overhaul to distance it from the health industry and allow consumers to sue it for negligence, say academics and consumer advocates after the regulator quietly announced moves to classify all pelvic mesh devices high risk after years of controversy.”
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Experts slam ‘utterly false’ claims Australians given budget flu vaccine

SMH, 30 October 2017
Author: Kate Aubusson
“Australia’s Chief Medical Officer has stridently rejected claims a “budget” flu vaccine was partly responsible for this year’s horror flu season, as the academic quoted called the reports “inaccurate”.”
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Uruguay’s mandatory breast cancer screening is challenged

The BMJ Opinion, 26 October 2017
Author: Ana Rosengurtt
“In 2006, it became mandatory for all women aged 40-59 in Uruquay to have a free mammography every two years, despite its National Cancer Registry showing a sustained decrease in breast cancer mortality since 1990. President Tabaré Vázquez, an oncologist by profession, instigated this. But, as previously reported in The BMJ: “It’s the only country in the world with this sort of mandatory screening. And there is absolutely no scientific basis for applying this to women between 40 and 50.”
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The Boston-Area Pharmacist Involved in a Deadly Meningitis Outbreak Has Been Cleared of Murder

Time, 26 October 2017
Author: Alanna Durkin Richer
“A pharmacist at a facility whose tainted drugs sparked a nationwide meningitis outbreak that killed 76 people was cleared Wednesday of murder but was convicted of mail fraud and racketeering.”
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Is Japan losing the fight against smoke-free legislation?

The BMJ Opinion, 24 October 2017
Author: Yusuke Tsugawa, Ken Hashimoto et al
“The WHO published a report earlier this year on the global tobacco epidemic in which it reported that comprehensive smoke-free legislation is in place to protect approximately 1.5 billion people in 55 countries. Currently, as many as 168 countries—including Japan—have signed the WHO’s Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC). However, Japan’s tobacco policy lags behind the FCTC’s standard and is currently ranked the lowest level for smoke-free policy in the world.”
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Round table: The Moral Mandate of Public Health – Back to Basics

European Journal of Public Health, Volume 27, Issue suppl_3, 2017
Chairs: John Middleton, Els Maeckelberghe
“The core mission of Public Health is to protect and promote health through the organized efforts of society. The use of political power to achieve public health goals, and the imperatives to improve health and reduce health inequalities, suggest an inherently moral agenda, and thus require a sound moral mandate. However, concerns have arisen about a lack of unified vision and leadership within Public Health, with consequent concerns about heightened threats to the health of the public.”
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Firearm Surrender Laws: Prompting Promise for Women’s Health

Ann Intern Med. 2017;167(8):591-592
Authors: Joslyn Fisher, Amy Bonomi
“Homicide is a leading cause of death in women of childbearing age. Further, more than half of female homicides with a known perpetrator are committed by a current or former intimate partner. Firearm access in the home exacerbates the risk for homicide by an intimate partner. Although federal legislation, such as the Violence Against Women Act, restricts domestic abusers’ access to firearms, state and local implementation of these regulations is highly variable.”
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Newly controversial opioid enforcement law under fire

The Hill, 17 October 2017
Author: Rachel Roubein
“Several lawmakers are pushing to repeal or revisit a law critics say enables the flow of deadly and addictive opioids, hours after President Trump’s drug czar nominee withdrew his name amid the controversy.”
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