The Hyde Amendment at 40 Years and Reproductive Rights in the United States

JAMA. 2017;317(15):1523-1524.
Authors: Eli Y. Adashi; Rachel H. Occhiogrosso
“On September 30, 1976, in the waning months of the 94th Congress, freshman Representative Henry J. Hyde (R-IL) witnessed his namesake amendment enacted into law via the Departments of Labor and Health, Education, and Welfare Appropriation Act of 1977 (PL 94-439). All of one sentence, the amendment stipulated that “None of the [Medicaid] funds contained in this Act shall be used to perform abortions except where the life of the mother would be endangered if the fetus were carried to term.”
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Revamping the US Federal Common Rule: Modernizing Human Participant Research Regulations

JAMA. 2017;317(15):1521-1522
Authors: James G. Hodge Jr; Lawrence O. Gostin
“On January 19, 2017, the Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP), Department of Health and Human Services, and 15 federal agencies published a final rule to modernize the Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects (known as the “Common Rule”). Initially introduced more than a quarter century ago, the Common Rule predated modern scientific methods and findings, notably human genome research.”
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Health Care Complaints Commission v Borthistle [2017] NSWCATOD 56

Decision date: 12 April 2017
“PROFESSIONS AND TRADES –— health practitioner — whether practitioner guilty of unsatisfactory professional conduct — whether practitioner guilty of professional misconduct — appropriate protective orders where finding made that practitioner is guilty of professional misconduct — pre-condition to making a “prohibition order”.
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Health Care Complaints Commission v Burton [2017] NSWCATOD 57

Decision date: 12 April 2017
“PROFESSIONS AND TRADES –— health practitioner — whether practitioner guilty of unsatisfactory professional conduct — whether practitioner guilty of professional misconduct — appropriate protective orders where finding made that practitioner is guilty of professional misconduct.”
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Pfizer subpoenaed in U.S. intravenous saline solution probe

Reuters, 19 April 2017
Author: Nate Raymond, Steve Orlofsky
“Pfizer Inc has received grand jury subpoenas from the U.S. Justice Department in connection with an antitrust investigation focusing on drugmakers that market intravenous saline solutions. The probe comes amid a shortage of intravenous saline solutions commonly used to hydrate hospital patients that dates back to late 2013, when drug companies began notifying hospitals that they might experience delivery delays. They said that since the shortage began, prices had risen 200 percent to 300 percent.”
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Italy experiencing measles epidemic after fall-off in vaccinations

The Guardian, 20 April 2017
Source: Reuters
“Italy is experiencing a measles epidemic following a fall-off in vaccinations. The Italian health ministry said on Wednesday there had been almost 1,500 registered cases of measles so far this year against some 840 in all of 2016 and some 250 in 2015. The Higher Health Institute says only around 85% of two-year-olds are being vaccinated against measles at present, well below the 95% threshold recommended by the World Health Organisation to block the illness.”
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More than 800 women sue NHS and manufacturers over vaginal mesh implants

The Guardian, 19 April 2017
Author: Hannah Devlin
“Some women reported that implants had cut into their vaginas, with one woman saying she was left in so much pain that she considered suicide. Others have been left unable to walk or have sex, according to the BBC. However, the medical regulator said that the best current evidence supports the continued use of mesh implants to resolve health conditions that could themselves cause serious distress to patients.”
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Gorsuch On Sidelines As Supreme Court Decides Insurance, Legal Sanctions Cases

Forbes, 18 April 2017
Author: Daniel Fisher
“The U.S. Supreme Court issued a pair of decisions today affecting legal sanctions and the power of states to control insurance contracts, noting in each one the non-participation of the court’s newest Justice, Neil Gorsuch.”
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Surgeon who operated on wrong vertebrae has no action taken against him

BMJ 2017; 357: j1817
Author: Clare Dyer
“A consultant neurosurgeon who operated on the wrong vertebrae in a patient’s spine then kept his mistake hidden from the patient and his NHS trust has been spared any sanction by a medical practitioners tribunal, despite its finding that his practice was impaired on the grounds of dishonesty.”
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