A Federal Ban on Making Lethal Viruses Is Lifted

NYT, 19 December 2017
Author: Donald G McNeil Jr
“Federal officials on Tuesday ended a moratorium imposed three years ago on funding research that alters germs to make them more lethal. Such work can now proceed, said Dr. Francis S. Collins, the head of the National Institutes of Health, but only if a scientific panel decides that the benefits justify the risks.”
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Roles and responsibilities of clinical ethics committees in priority setting

BMC Medical Ethics, 2017 18:68
Authors: Morten Magelssen, Ingrid Miljeteig, Reidar Pedersen, Reidun Førde
“Fair prioritization of healthcare resources has been on the agenda for decades, but resource allocation dilemmas in clinical practice remain challenging. Can clinical ethics committees (CECs) be of help? The aim of the study was to explore whether and how CECs handle priority setting dilemmas and contribute to raising awareness of fairness concerns.”
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1 in 10 medical products in developing countries is substandard or falsified

WHO, 28 November 2017
Source: WHO Media Centre
“An estimated 1 in 10 medical products circulating in low- and middle-income countries is either substandard or falsified, according to new research from WHO. This means that people are taking medicines that fail to treat or prevent disease. Not only is this a waste of money for individuals and health systems that purchase these products, but substandard or falsified medical products can cause serious illness or even death.”
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Medical Board of Australia and Panegyres [2017] WASAT 146

Decision date: 21 November 2017
“Medical practitioner – Disciplinary matters – Unprofessional conduct – Professional misconduct – Charging patient for services not provided – Charging patient for services not clinically indicated – Charging for services where no clinical notes – Charging Medicare Australia for services – Code of Conduct for doctors in Australia – Capacity of patient to make decisions concerning his estate – Conduct substantially below standard reasonably expected of a health practitioner of an equivalent level of training or experience.”
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Australia urged to sue Big Tobacco for past healthcare costs

SMH, 20 November 2017
Authors: Steve Lillebuen, Neelima Choahan
“Australia should consider suing Big Tobacco to recover the tens of billions spent each year on smoking-related illnesses, health researchers say. More than $30 billion is estimated to be spent each year on the health, social and economic costs related to smoking as one of the country’s preventable causes of death.”
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The Impact of State Medical Malpractice Reform on Individual-Level Health Care Expenditures

Health Services Research, 2017, 52(6), 2018–2037
Authors: Hao Yu, Michael Greenberg, Amelia Haviland
“Past studies of the impact of state-level medical malpractice reforms on health spending produced mixed findings. Particularly salient is the evidence gap concerning the effect of different types of malpractice reform. This study aims to fill the gap. It extends the literature by examining the general population, not a subgroup or a specific health condition, and controlling for individual-level sociodemographic and health status.”
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Red Cross: $6 Million Meant to Fight Ebola Was Stolen Through Fraud

Time, 6 November 2017
Authors: Clarence Roy-Macaulay, Krista Larson
“Fraud by Red Cross workers and others wasted at least $6 million meant to fight the deadly Ebola outbreak in West Africa, the organization confirmed Saturday. The revelations follow an internal investigation of how the organization handled more than $124 million during the 2014-2016 epidemic that killed more than 11,000 people in Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea.”
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Australia’s health watchdog accused of ‘too close’ relationship with industry

SMH, 5 November 2017
Author: Joanne McCarthy
“Australia’s drug and medical device watchdog, the Therapeutic Goods Administration, needs a complete overhaul to distance it from the health industry and allow consumers to sue it for negligence, say academics and consumer advocates after the regulator quietly announced moves to classify all pelvic mesh devices high risk after years of controversy.”
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Drug giants threaten NHS with legal action over cheaper drug that could save £84m a year

The Guardian, 1 November 2017
Author: Sarah Boseley
“Two multinational drug companies are threatening legal action to prevent patients being offered a cheap version of an effective drug against blindness which could save the NHS millions of pounds.”
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