Self-tests for influenza: an empirical ethics investigation

BMC Medical Ethics 2017 18:33
Authors: Benedict Rumbold, Clare Wenham, James Wilson
“In this article we aim to assess the ethical desirability of self-test diagnostic kits for influenza, focusing in particular on the potential benefits and challenges posed by a new, mobile phone-based tool currently being developed by i-sense, an interdisciplinary research collaboration based (primarily) at University College London and funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council.”
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A four-part working bibliography of neuroethics: part 3 – “second tradition neuroethics” – ethical issues in neuroscience

Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 2016 11:7
Authors: Amanda Martin, Kira Becker, Martina Darragh and James Giordano
“Neuroethics describes several interdisciplinary topics exploring the application and implications of engaging neuroscience in societal contexts. To explore this topic, we present Part 3 of a four-part bibliography of neuroethics’ literature focusing on the “ethics of neuroscience.”
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Israeli doctors reject force-feeding prisoners on hunger strike

Al Monitor, 10 May 2017
Author: Daoud Kuttab
“Israeli doctors continue to reject attempts by prison authorities to participate in any force-feeding or forced treatment of Palestinian prisoners who are on a hunger strike. The Israeli executive director of Physicians for Human Rights Israel (PHRI), told Al-Monitor that Israeli doctors see any force used in medical treatment as unethical. the Israeli Medical Association (IMA) has, for a number of years, refused to participate in any force-feeding of prisoners. The International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) and The World Medical Association (WMA) also opposes force-feeding.”
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Billions saved because FDA didn’t rush approval of Alzheimer’s drug

Reuters, 10 May 2017
Author: Gene Emery
“The U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s decision not to rush approval for Eli Lilly’s experimental Alzheimer’s treatment solanezumab – a drug that turned out to be ineffective – may have saved American taxpayers as much as $100 billion over the past four years, an analysis concludes. The analysis comes amid pressure on FDA to use less-strict standards in deciding whether a drug should be approved. Some agency critics have called on the government to approve all drugs that are not toxic and let market forces determine which are best.”
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Fertility regulator launches inquiry into ‘cash for eggs’ claims

The Guardian, 2 May 2017
Author: Haroon Siddique
“The fertility regulator has launched an investigation into allegations that IVF clinics are inducing women to donate eggs in return for free or discounted treatment. Women on low incomes who have healthy eggs but cannot get pregnant are being given complimentary treatment or offered a discount if they donate eggs at some clinics, which then resell them for a large profit. Egg sharing, where women receive IVF as a benefit in kind in return for donating eggs, is legal but there are strict rules on the information that should be provided to potential donors and how consent is obtained.”
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On classifying the field of medical ethics

BMC Medical Ethics 2017 18:30
Authors: Kristine Bærøe, Jonathan Ives, Martine de Vries, Jan Schildmann
“In 2014, the editorial board of BMC Medical Ethics came together to devise sections for the journal that would (a) give structure to the journal (b) help ensure that authors’ research is matched to the most appropriate editors and (c) help readers to find the research most relevant to them. The editorial board decided to take a practical approach to devising sections that dealt with the challenges of content management. After that, we started thinking more theoretically about how one could go about classifying the field of medical ethics. This editorial elaborates and reflects on the practical approach that we took at the journal, then considers an alternative theoretically derived approach, and reflects on the possibilities, challenges and value of classifying the field more broadly.”
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Core information sets for informed consent to surgical interventions: baseline information of importance to patients and clinicians

BMC Medical Ethics 2017 18:29
Authors: Barry G. Main, Angus G. K. McNair, Richard Huxtable, et al
“Consent remains a crucial, yet challenging, cornerstone of clinical practice. The ethical, legal and professional understandings of this construct have evolved away from a doctor-centred act to a patient-centred process that encompasses the patient’s values, beliefs and goals. This alignment of consent with the philosophy of shared decision-making was affirmed in a recent high-profile Supreme Court ruling in England.”
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A more ethical form of HIV criminalization

Global Bioethics Blog, 22 April 2017
Author: Stuart Rennie
“HIV has been criminalized throughout the history of the epidemic, or to be more exact, people living with HIV and their behaviors have been a persistent focus of criminal law. This was undoubtedly due in part to the fact that HIV initially was untreatable and infection (for the vast majority) spelt death. It was terrifying. But it wasn’t just an understandable public health reaction. Criminalization is not necessarily a wise way of controlling an epidemic, as it can be counterproductive, driving underground persons potentially subject to the laws.”
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Ethical conflicts in the treatment of fasting Muslim patients with diabetes during Ramadan

Med Health Care and Philos (2017). doi:10.1007/s11019-017-9777-y
Authors: Ilhan Ilkilic, Hakan Ertin
“Ethical problems arising from fasting during the month of Ramadan for practicing Muslim patients are being discussed on the basis of extant research literature. Relevant conflicts of interest originating in this situation are being analysed from an ethical perspective.”
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