Preventing The Spread Of HIV With One Simple Gadget

Forbes, 28 June 2017
Author: Lee Bell
“In 2007, the World Health Organization (WHO) and UNAIDS cited that Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision can reduce the risk of HIV infection by approximately 60 percent in high risk areas such as Sub Saharan Africa. So to save millions of lives and billions of dollars in long-term HIV/AIDS healthcare costs, UNAIDS is leading a campaign that involves the circumcision of 27 million men. But how do you get million so men to willingly opt into such a personal and potentially dangerous procedure? You invent a device that makes it easy, painless and cheap.”
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Why using AI in healthcare requires a balance of efficiency and ethics

Information Management, 16 June 2017
Author: Michael Breggar
“Along with predicting epidemics, diagnosing diseases and counseling patients, artificial intelligence is also proving its worth in healthcare delivery to enable a better patient experience. From making sense of the unwieldy mass of medical data trapped in healthcare systems to tapping into the collective knowledge gathered from several thousand healthcare providers and millions of patient visits, doctors can now start to analyze which treatments work best and when.”
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Online access to abortion pill may be safe alternative to clinics

Reuters, 1 June 2017
Author: Lisa Rapaport
“Women who don’t have access to reproductive health clinics can safely use telemedicine services to consult with a doctor and get drugs to terminate their pregnancy without surgery, suggests a study of Irish women. About one quarter of the world’s population lives in countries with highly restrictive abortion laws and where women may resort to unsafe methods to end pregnancies. This results in an estimated 43,000 deaths every year. The current study showed that 95 percent of the women reported successfully terminating their pregnancies without surgical intervention using medication they received in the mail after providing their medical details and consulting with a trained helpdesk team on how to use the drug.”
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Medical device theft at SSM Health puts data on 836 patients at risk

Information Management, 30 May 2017
Author: Joseph Goedert
“A medical device that records physiological data was stolen on April 12 from SSM Health Orthopedics, which operates out of SSM Health-owned DePaul Hospital in St. Louis, potentially affecting the data of 836 patients. The organization said the medical device, which looks similar to a laptop computer, contained in its memory some physiological data as well as protected health information from patients who participated in a study between 2002 and 2017. The organization notified the patients that some of their protected health information has been compromised.”
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Navigating the ethical clash between access to health information and proprietary databases

MedicalXpress, 15 May 2017
Source: Baylor College of Medicine
“Sharing medical information, including genomic data, has the potential to benefit public health. However, companies that generate that information have a legal right to protect it as a trade secret. Legal and ethical conflict exists between individuals’ right to access their personal health information and the protection of these trade secrets. The data gathered from these genetic tests can provide important insights when making an individual diagnosis or pursuing clinical treatments, thereby having a direct impact on patient care. On the other hand, if companies and innovators are able to keep certain pieces of data and their processes secret, they are more easily able to recover their investment in the project and use it to finance new diagnostic tests.”
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NHS services hit in global cyber-attack across 12 countries

The Guardian, 13 May 2017
Authors: Damien Gayle, Alexandra Topping, Ian Sample, Sarah Marsh and Vikram Dodd
“The NHS has been hit as part of a global cyber-attack that threw hospitals and businesses in the UK and around the world into chaos. The unprecedented attack on Friday affected 12 countries and at least 16 NHS trusts in the UK, compromising IT systems that underpin patient safety. Staff across the NHS were locked out of their computers and trusts had to divert emergency patients. The same malicious software that hit NHS networks attacked some of the largest companies in Spain and Portugal and has also been detected on computers in Russia, Ukraine, Taiwan and eight other countries. In the UK, computers in hospitals and GP surgeries simultaneously received a pop-up message demanding a ransom in exchange for access to the PCs.”
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‘I went to the web to find a new kidney’

BBC, 1 May 2017
Author: Lesley Curwen
“A growing number of UK patients have bypassed the traditional NHS system of organ allocation, instead harnessing the power of the internet to find their own. Transplant doctors fear this development could result in an unsavoury competition to attract donors online, in what some have called an “organ beauty pageant”. And they worry that it rips up the traditional health service ethos of equal access to treatment for all.”
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Patient privacy breach: over 1,400 medical letters found dumped in Sydney bin

SMH, 21 April 2017
Author: Kate Aubusson
“More than 700 public patients have had their privacy breached after more than 1000 medical letters were found dumped in Sydney bin. The incident has prompted Health Minister to launch an external review into the transcription services across all NSW public health facilities. This incident bolstered the case of an overhaul of the current paper-heavy health correspondence system and comprehensive switch to digital health record keeping.”
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Who will own your data when your electronic health records are linked to Aadhaar?

Scroll.in, 6 April 2017
Authors: Anumeha Yadav, Menaka Rao
“After making Aadhaar necessary to access a number of services, the government is now ready to start linking health records to the biometrics-based identity number system. “Patients’ Aadhaar numbers will be linked to a second health ID and these will be used in electronic health records,” The health records will contain all the information related to the patient including name, address, and the health records produced during his or her visit to the hospital such as X-ray reports, blood test reports among others.”
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F.D.A. Will Allow 23andMe to Sell Genetic Tests for Disease Risk to Consumers

NYT, 6 April 2017
Author: Gina Kolata
“For the first time, the Food and Drug Administration said it would allow a company to sell genetic tests for disease risk directly to consumers, providing people with information about the likelihood that they could develop various conditions, including Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s. The move on Thursday is a turnaround for the agency, which had imposed a moratorium in 2013 on disease tests sold by 23andMe. The decision is expected to open the floodgates for more direct-to-consumer tests for disease risks, drawing a road map for other companies to do the same thing.”
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