Patient privacy breach: over 1,400 medical letters found dumped in Sydney bin

SMH, 21 April 2017
Author: Kate Aubusson
“More than 700 public patients have had their privacy breached after more than 1000 medical letters were found dumped in Sydney bin. The incident has prompted Health Minister to launch an external review into the transcription services across all NSW public health facilities. This incident bolstered the case of an overhaul of the current paper-heavy health correspondence system and comprehensive switch to digital health record keeping.”
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Who will own your data when your electronic health records are linked to Aadhaar?

Scroll.in, 6 April 2017
Authors: Anumeha Yadav, Menaka Rao
“After making Aadhaar necessary to access a number of services, the government is now ready to start linking health records to the biometrics-based identity number system. “Patients’ Aadhaar numbers will be linked to a second health ID and these will be used in electronic health records,” The health records will contain all the information related to the patient including name, address, and the health records produced during his or her visit to the hospital such as X-ray reports, blood test reports among others.”
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F.D.A. Will Allow 23andMe to Sell Genetic Tests for Disease Risk to Consumers

NYT, 6 April 2017
Author: Gina Kolata
“For the first time, the Food and Drug Administration said it would allow a company to sell genetic tests for disease risk directly to consumers, providing people with information about the likelihood that they could develop various conditions, including Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s. The move on Thursday is a turnaround for the agency, which had imposed a moratorium in 2013 on disease tests sold by 23andMe. The decision is expected to open the floodgates for more direct-to-consumer tests for disease risks, drawing a road map for other companies to do the same thing.”
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The Data Show Hospitals Need To Do Better At Protecting Your Personal Data

Forbes, 5 April 2017
Author: Bruce Y. Lee
“How safe is your personal data at hospitals? Well, a study just published in JAMA Internal Medicine found 1,798 incidences of large data breaches in patient information over roughly a seven-year period. These were cybersecurity failures either from hacks or mistakes that in each case exposed the records of more than 500 individuals. Hospitals and other healthcare providers usually have your financial information, personal health history and lots of detailed information that can affect your job prospects, your credit, many things in your life, etc.”
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Indigenous elders develop app in bid to reduce youth suicide rate

The Guardian, 6 April 2017
Source: Australian Associated Press
“Self-harm is the leading killer of young Indigenous people but elders from one remote Northern Territory community bucking that trend hope to save lives by bringing their traditional wisdom into the digital age. Warlpiri elders from Lajamanu have partnered with the Black Dog Institute to develop Australia’s first Indigenous community-led suicide prevention app. Young Aboriginal people die from suicide at five times the national rate.”
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Right-to-die case: Shrewsbury’s Noel Conway loses court bid

BBC, 30 March 2017
Source: BBC News
“A man with terminal motor neurone disease has lost a High Court bid to challenge the law on assisted dying. Mr Conway was seeking a declaration that the Suicide Act 1961 is incompatible with Article 8 of the Human Rights Act 1998, which relates to respect for private and family life, and Article 14, which enables protection from discrimination. He had hoped to bring a judicial review that could result in terminally ill adults who meet strict criteria, making their own decisions about ending their lives.”
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Health center finds virus on computer with patient info

Information Management, 21 March 2017
Author: Joseph Goedert
“The health center at Lane Community College in Eugene, Ore., is notifying patients that their protected health information may have been compromised after finding one of its computers was infected with a virus for 11 months. Patient data at risk included names, dates of birth, addresses, phone numbers, Social Security numbers and diagnoses.”
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Employee looked at patient info for 5 years at Nebraska hospital

Information Management, 8 March 2017
Author: Joseph Goedert
“Chadron Community Hospital, recently learned that an employee was accessing patient records outside of job duties for more than five years. An investigation found that compromised patient information included names, addresses, dates of birth, clinical information from the electronic health record system (diagnoses, orders, provider notes and test results) and insurance information. The hospital is notifying 702 patients and advising them to monitor financial accounts.”
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Google’s DeepMind plans bitcoin-style health record tracking for hospitals

The Guardian, 9 March 2017
Author: Alex Hern
“Google’s AI-powered health tech subsidiary, DeepMind Health, is planning to use a new technology loosely based on bitcoin to let hospitals, the NHS and eventually even patients track what happens to personal data in real-time. DeepMind has faced criticism from patient groups for what they claim are overly broad data sharing agreements. Critics fear that the data sharing has the potential to give DeepMind, and thus Google, too much power over the NHS.”
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The ethics of tracking athletes’ biometric data

MedicalXpress, 18 January 2017
Author: Heather Zeiger
“Biometric technologies have become household devices. Professional sports leagues use some of the most technologically advanced biodata tracking systems to monitor athlete performance as well as prevent potential injuries. Many of these tracking devices involve around the clock surveillance of athletes’ bio signs raising several bioethical questions that apply to everyday users as well. Questions of privacy, autonomy, confidentiality, and conflicts of interest are just a few of the bioethical issues raised by new biodata tracking technologies.”
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