ACCC sues Voltaren makers GlaxoSmithKline and Novartis for misleading consumers

SMH, 6 December 2017
Author: Esther Han
“Two pharma giants have been taken to the Federal Court for allegedly misleading osteoarthritis sufferers into paying 33 per cent more for a “more effective” product that offers “targeted relief”, when this was not the case.”
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F.D.A. Speeds Review of Gene Therapies, Vowing to Target Rogue Clinics

NYT, 17 November 2017
Authors: Sheila Kaplan, Denise Grady
“The Food and Drug Administration on Thursday issued new guidelines to speed the introduction of treatments involving human cells and tissues, including gene therapy. But the agency also said it would crack down on rogue clinics offering dangerous or unproven versions of those treatments.”
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Australia urged to sue Big Tobacco for past healthcare costs

SMH, 20 November 2017
Authors: Steve Lillebuen, Neelima Choahan
“Australia should consider suing Big Tobacco to recover the tens of billions spent each year on smoking-related illnesses, health researchers say. More than $30 billion is estimated to be spent each year on the health, social and economic costs related to smoking as one of the country’s preventable causes of death.”
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Can options make us worse off? Choice, pressure, and paid kidney donation

JME Blog, 7 November 2017
Author: Julian J. Koplin
“Paying people to donate a ‘spare’ kidney might help alleviate the current shortage of transplantable organs. However, doing so would conflict with a principle widely accepted within the medical community since the earliest days of organ transplantation: that bodily organs should not be bought and sold. My paper focuses on one important facet of the organ market debate: the question of whether it can be bad to have the option of selling one’s kidney.”
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Australia’s health watchdog accused of ‘too close’ relationship with industry

SMH, 5 November 2017
Author: Joanne McCarthy
“Australia’s drug and medical device watchdog, the Therapeutic Goods Administration, needs a complete overhaul to distance it from the health industry and allow consumers to sue it for negligence, say academics and consumer advocates after the regulator quietly announced moves to classify all pelvic mesh devices high risk after years of controversy.”
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Drug giants threaten NHS with legal action over cheaper drug that could save £84m a year

The Guardian, 1 November 2017
Author: Sarah Boseley
“Two multinational drug companies are threatening legal action to prevent patients being offered a cheap version of an effective drug against blindness which could save the NHS millions of pounds.”
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U.S. states allege broad generic drug price-fixing collusion

Reuters, 1 November 2017
Author: Karen Freifeld
“A large group of U.S. states accused key players in the generic drug industry of a broad price-fixing conspiracy, moving on Tuesday to widen an earlier lawsuit to add many more drugmakers and medicines in an action that sent some company shares tumbling.”
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The deadly business of an unregulated global stem cell industry

Journal of Medical Ethics 2017;43:744-746.
Authors: Lysaght T, Lipworth W, Hendl T, et al.
“In 2016, the Office of the State Coroner of New South Wales released its report into the death of an Australian woman, Sheila Drysdale, who had died from complications of an autologous stem cell procedure at a Sydney clinic. In this report, we argue that Mrs Drysdale’s death was avoidable, and it was the result of a pernicious global problem of an industry exploiting regulatory systems to sell unproven and unjustified interventions with stem cells.”
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Vaginal mesh scandal: women don’t need body-shaming on top of their pain

The Guardian, 1 October 2017
Author: Barbara Ellen
“The ongoing vaginal mesh implant scandal is a complex affair, with group lawsuits erupting all around the world, including the US, the UK and Australia. Last week, Johnson & Johnson’s Ethicon unit was ordered to pay a record $57m in damages to a woman called Ella Ebaugh. The J&J implant, launched without a clinical trial, is still marketed, often in cases involving traumatic births, years after it was known to cause appalling problems to women such as Ebaugh, including intense pelvic pain and torn bladders and vaginas, leading to agonising sex and incontinence.”
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