Why Assam’s two-child policy plan is being criticised by public health experts

ScrollIn, 13 April 2017
Author: Arunabh Saikia
“India: Assam’s health minister unveiled the draft of a new population policy for the state. It proposes, among other things, to penalise people who have more than two children. If the draft were to become law, they would be ineligible for government jobs and benefits, and be barred from contesting all elections held under the aegis of the state election commission.”
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Who will own your data when your electronic health records are linked to Aadhaar?

Scroll.in, 6 April 2017
Authors: Anumeha Yadav, Menaka Rao
“After making Aadhaar necessary to access a number of services, the government is now ready to start linking health records to the biometrics-based identity number system. “Patients’ Aadhaar numbers will be linked to a second health ID and these will be used in electronic health records,” The health records will contain all the information related to the patient including name, address, and the health records produced during his or her visit to the hospital such as X-ray reports, blood test reports among others.”
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Human rights violations in organ procurement practice in China

BMC Medical Ethics 2017 18:11
Authors: Norbert W. Paul, Arthur Caplan, Michael E. Shapiro, Charl Els, Kirk C. Allison, Huige Li
“Over 90% of the organs transplanted in China before 2010 were procured from prisoners. Although Chinese officials announced in December 2014 that the country would completely cease using organs harvested from prisoners, no regulatory adjustments or changes in China’s organ donation laws followed. As a result, the use of prisoner organs remains legal in China if consent is obtained.”
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Urgent need for reform in Nepal’s medical education

The Lancet, Volume 388, No. 10061, p2739–2740, 3 December 2016
Authors: Bipin Adhikari, Shiva Raj Mishra
“Nepal is a low-income nation with a population of nearly 26·5 million. The doctor–patient ratio is 0·17 per 1000 population—substantially less than the WHO recommendation of 2·3 doctors per 1000 population. Nepal has seen a burgeoning of medical institutes in the past 10 years. However, this rapid surge in the number of medical colleges—with increases in fees and corruption involved in student admissions—has not aided undergraduate and postgraduate medical training, deteriorating the quality of medical education. The financial motives involved in these private medical colleges have further incurred political meddling, often resulting in disproportionate and unregulated licensing and affiliation to such colleges, which are not instructed to establish themselves in rural areas.”
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Knowledge, attitude and practice of healthcare ethics among resident doctors and ward nurses from a resource poor setting, Nepal

BMC Medical Ethics 2016 17:68
Authors: Samaj Adhikari, Kumar Paudel, Arja R. Aro, Tara Ballav Adhikari, Bipin Adhikari, Shiva Raj Mishra
“Healthcare ethics is neglected in clinical practice in LMICs (Low and Middle Income Countries) such as Nepal. The main objective of this study was to assess the current status of knowledge, attitude and practice of healthcare ethics among resident doctors and ward nurses in a tertiary teaching hospital in Nepal.”
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