Nonvoluntary Psychiatric Treatment Is Distinct From Involuntary Psychiatric Treatment

JAMA. 2017; 318(11): 999-1000.
Author: Dominic A. Sisti
“Some of the most ethically challenging cases in mental health care involve providing treatment to individuals who refuse that treatment. Sometimes when persons with mental illness become unsafe to themselves or others, they must be taken, despite their outward and often vigorous refusal, to an emergency department or psychiatric hospital to receive treatment, such as stabilizing psychotropic medication. On occasion, to provide medical care over objection, a patient must be physically restrained.”
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The ethical basis for performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation only after informed consent in selected patient groups admitted to hospital

Clinical Ethics, 12(3), 111-116
Authors: Philip Berry, Iona Heath
“Cardiopulmonary resuscitation is frequently performed on patients who, in retrospect, had a very low chance of survival. This is because all patients are ‘For cardiopulmonary resuscitation’ on admission to hospital by default, and delays occur before cardiopulmonary resuscitation can be ‘de-prescribed’. This article reviews the nature of potential harms caused by futile cardiopulmonary resuscitation, the reasons why de-prescription may be delayed, recent legal judgements relevant to timely do not attempt cardiopulmonary resuscitation decision making, and the possible detrimental effects of do not attempt cardiopulmonary resuscitation discussions on end of life care.”
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Informed consent and registry-based research – the case of the Danish circumcision registry

BMC Medical Ethics 2017 18:53
Authors: Thomas Ploug, Søren Holm
“Research into personal health data holds great potential not only for improved treatment but also for economic growth. In these years many countries are developing policies aimed at facilitating such research often under the banner of ‘big data’. A central point of debate is whether the secondary use of health data requires informed consent if the data is anonymised.”
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Oral surgeon whose misconduct was “serious, persistent, and shocking” is struck off

BMJ 2017; 358: j4255
Author: Clare Dyer
“A consultant maxillofacial surgeon who harmed patients by carrying out inappropriate surgery—including using an experimental material to rebuild bone—without obtaining informed consent has been struck off the UK medical register.”
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Zika vaccine research: guidance for including pregnant women

Wellcome Trust, 29 June 2017
Source: Wellcome
“Zika infection in pregnancy can have devastating effects on normal fetal development. But pregnant women are often automatically excluded from vaccine trials over safety concerns. New guidance for including pregnant woman and their babies in Zika vaccine research has been published today. The guidelines argue that those most at risk from the virus – pregnant women and their babies – should be at the centre of Zika vaccine development.”
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111 People Ended Their Lives in 6 Months Under California’s New Right-to-Die Law

Fortune, 28 June 2017
Author: Sy Mukherjee
“In 2016, California became the sixth state to enact a “right-to-die” or physician-assisted suicide law (Washington, D.C. also has one in place). Health officials from the Golden State now report that 111 terminally ill patients used the law to legally end their lives in its first six months. 59 people who requested life-ending medication didn’t wind up taking it by the end of 2016 (21 others died without taking the drugs in the first place).”
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Guam abortion reporting requirements may conflict with federal privacy laws

PacificDailyNews, 27 June 2017
Author: Haidee V Eugenio
“A law passed late last year toughens mandatory reporting requirements for abortions on Guam, but the Department of Public Health and Social Services has not verified whether the requirements are being followed, citing a possible conflict with federal medical privacy laws. The federal law includes a privacy provision that limits the disclosure of patient information without the patient’s approval.”
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Euthanasia survey hints at support from doctors, nurses and division

SMH, 24 June 2017
Author: James Robertson
“Most NSW doctors and nurses support a controversial medical euthanasia bill headed for Parliament, according to research that could prompt new debate about the medical fraternity’s willingness to accept changes to assisted suicide laws. A bill, to allow patients to apply for medically assisted euthanasia in specific circumstances when older than 25, will be introduced to the NSW upper house in August for a conscience vote. About 60 per cent of doctors support the Voluntary Assisted Dying Bill and fewer than 30 per cent oppose it.”
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Scotland to introduce soft opt-out system for organ donation

The Guardian, 28 June 2017
Author: Severin Carrell
“Scottish ministers are to introduce a new system of organ donations based on presumed consent in an effort to increase life-saving organ transplants. The change of policy follows the introduction in Wales of a presumed consent system in December 2015, which led to a rise in organ donations and an increase in the number of families agreeing to donations. Last year there were 39 organs transplanted in Wales using its deemed consent system out of 160 organ transplants. Only 6% of people opted out of the system. The Scottish government’s decision to follow suit will increase pressure on ministers in London and possibly in Northern Ireland to introduce similar reforms. ”
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Court rules hospital can withdraw life support for sick baby

KFOR, 27 June 2017
Author: Nadia Judith Enchassi
“The European Court of Human Rights ruled Tuesday a hospital can discontinue life support to a baby suffering from a rare genetic disease. Born in August, Charlie Gard has a rare genetic disorder caused by a genetic mutation that leads to weakened muscles and organ dysfunction, among other symptoms, with a poor prognosis for most patients. Charlie is on life support and has been in the intensive care unit at the Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children in London since October. His doctors wish to take him off life support, but his parents disagreed.”
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