GSK must pay $3 million in generic Paxil suicide lawsuit: U.S. jury

Reuters, 20 April 2017
Authors: Nate Raymond, Barbara Grzincic
“GlaxoSmithKline(GSK.L) must pay $3 million to a woman who sued the drug company over the death of her husband, a lawyer who committed suicide after taking a generic version of the antidepressant Paxil, a U.S. jury said on Thursday. A federal judge allowed the victim’s wife to proceed against GSK because it controlled the drug’s design and label, which applied to both the brand-name and generic versions of the drug.”
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Are mental health tribunals only a nominal challenge?

BMJ 2017; 357:j1836
Authors: Paul Gosney, Paul Lomax, Aileen O’Brien
“We read with interest Wise’s article regarding the rise in detentions under the Mental Health Act (MHA), outlining the obvious human rights concerns. What happens to people detained under the MHA once they enter hospital is rarely discussed. Their legal rights are protected by the Mental Health Review Tribunal system.”
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Stronger Indigenous culture would cut suicide rates, health congress told

The Guardian, 5 April 2017
Author: Calla Wahlquist
“The solution to reducing the staggering rates of suicide among indigenous communities worldwide lies in strengthening culture rather than just focusing on issues such as drug and alcohol abuse, experts at a global conference have said. Suicide is a leading cause of death among young indigenous people worldwide and efforts to solve the problem using methods developed in non-indigenous communities have not reversed the trend.”
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Indigenous elders develop app in bid to reduce youth suicide rate

The Guardian, 6 April 2017
Source: Australian Associated Press
“Self-harm is the leading killer of young Indigenous people but elders from one remote Northern Territory community bucking that trend hope to save lives by bringing their traditional wisdom into the digital age. Warlpiri elders from Lajamanu have partnered with the Black Dog Institute to develop Australia’s first Indigenous community-led suicide prevention app. Young Aboriginal people die from suicide at five times the national rate.”
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Suicide rate among defence veterans far higher than for those currently serving

The Guardian, 30 March 2017
Author: Gareth Hutchens
“The rate of suicide among current serving Australian defence force (ADF) members is much lower than the general population, but higher for those who have left the force, particularly if under 30 years of age. The National Mental Health Commission says the reason for this phenomenon needs to be better understood, requiring further investigation. The Commission says more needs to be done to ensure suicide and self-harm is prevented among current and former ADF personnel.”
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Cross-sectional survey on defensive practices and defensive behaviours among Israeli psychiatrists

BMJ Open 2017; 7:e014153.
Authors: Reuveni I, Pelov I, Reuveni H, et al
“Psychiatry is a low-risk specialisation; however, there is a steady increase in malpractice claims against psychiatrists. Defensive psychiatry (DP) refers to any action undertaken by a psychiatrist to avoid malpractice liability that is not for the sole benefit of the patient’s mental health and well-being. The objectives of this study were to assess the scope of DP practised by psychiatrists and to understand whether awareness of DP correlated with defensive behaviours.”
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To stop doctors ending their lives, we need to hear from those suffering

The Guardian, 21 March 2017
Author: Ranjana Srivastava
“The revelation that four junior doctors have taken their own lives in recent months obliges us to look at why doctors with mental illnesses don’t speak up. There is ample evidence for the high rates of mental illness in doctors, several times greater compared with other professions and the general population. Armed with knowledge and surrounded by advice, why do doctors commit suicide at an alarmingly high rate?”
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Some Gun Laws Tied to Lower Suicide Rates

NYT, 15 March 2017
Author: Nicholas Bakalar
“Background checks and waiting periods for gun purchases are associated with lower suicide rates. According to the National Center for Health Statistics, the national suicide rate is now 13 per 100,000, a 30-year high. Researchers found that states with universal background checks had a decrease of 0.29 suicides per 100,000 people from 2013 to 2014. Those without such laws had an average increase of 0.85.”
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NHS mental health trust to be prosecuted amid claims it failed to offer safe care

The Guardian, 7 March 2017
Author: Haroon Siddique
“A mental health trust is to be the first NHS provider to be prosecuted under legislation brought in after the Mid Staffs scandal. It is accused of failing to provide safe care and treatment resulting in avoidable harm to a patient and other patients being exposed to a significant risk of avoidable harm, the Care Quality Commission (CQC) said on Monday.”
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Interrupting the Mental Illness–Incarceration-Recidivism Cycle

JAMA. 2017; 317(7): 695-696.
Authors: Matthew E. Hirschtritt, Renee L. Binder
“This Viewpoint offers ways people with serious mental illness can be diverted from prison by preventing court involvment, developing mental health courts, mandating police training, providing housing, and developing outpatient treatment progams.”
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