IN THE MATTER OF ED (Mental Health) [2017] ACAT 84

Decision date: 18 October 2017
“MENTAL HEALTH – authorisation of short-term involuntary detention for immediate treatment, care or support – statutory preconditions for initial detention by a doctor for 3 days – Tribunal order extending the period of involuntary detention for a period not longer than an additional 11 days – Tribunal review of involuntary detention under section 85 of the Mental Health Act – relevant conditions and when they must apply for exercise of discretionary power.”
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Locked up, locked out – inadequate stats on mental health are failing prisoners

The Guardian, 11 October 2017
Author: Mary O’Hara
“Prisoners are among the most vulnerable people with mental health problems, yet the government does not collect even basic information on how many inmates have a mental illness, or the total number in need of treatment. This means, according to campaigners, that they are being repeatedly let down by the system.”
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How should the government overhaul mental health laws?

The Guardian, 10 October 2017
Author: Saba Salman
“The promise to overhaul the Mental Health Act 1983 is one of the few Conservative party manifesto pledges to survive the election. The decision to reform the act, which appeared in the Queen’s speech in June, means the government is committed to taking steps to overhaul the legislation in the next 12 months.”
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Mental health and human rights in Russia—a flawed relationship

The Lancet, 390 (10102), p1613–1615, September 2017
Author: Robert van Voren
“When the Soviet Union disintegrated in 1991, new independent psychiatric associations were established in many of the former Soviet republics, and groups of reform-minded psychiatrists initiated projects to discard the old Soviet psychiatric system, a system notorious for its political abuse of psychiatry and characterised by an almost exclusively biological orientation and institutional form of care. Russia was no exception and even boasted some of the most prominent mental health reformers, such as psychiatrist Yuri Nuller in St Petersburg and the Moscow-based lawyer Svetlana Polubinskaya, an associate of the Institute of State and Law who formulated the Soviet Union’s last law on psychiatric help and Russia’s first law on psychiatric care, which was adopted in 1992.”
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Nonvoluntary Psychiatric Treatment Is Distinct From Involuntary Psychiatric Treatment

JAMA. 2017; 318(11): 999-1000.
Author: Dominic A. Sisti
“Some of the most ethically challenging cases in mental health care involve providing treatment to individuals who refuse that treatment. Sometimes when persons with mental illness become unsafe to themselves or others, they must be taken, despite their outward and often vigorous refusal, to an emergency department or psychiatric hospital to receive treatment, such as stabilizing psychotropic medication. On occasion, to provide medical care over objection, a patient must be physically restrained.”
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NHS and police blamed for killing by psychiatric patient on conditional discharge

BMJ 2017; 357: j3103
Author: Clare Dyer
“An independent inquiry commissioned by NHS England into the case of a psychiatric patient, previously committed for killing her mother, who killed another woman while on conditional discharge, has identified serious failings by the NHS and the Metropolitan Police.”
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NHS prescribed record number of antidepressants last year

The Guardian, 30 June 2017
Author: Denis Campbell
“The NHS prescribed a record number of antidepressants last year, fuelling an upward trend that has seen the number of pills given to patients more than double over the last decade. The figures raised questions over whether the rise shows doctors are handing out the drugs out too freely or whether it means more people are getting help to tackle their anxiety, depression and panic attacks. Prescriptions for 64.7m items of antidepressants – an all-time high – were dispensed in England in 2016.”
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Suicide and self-harm in prisons hit worst ever levels

The Guardian, 29 June 2017
Author: Rajeev Syal
“Prisons have “struggled to cope” with record rates of suicide and self-harm among inmates following cuts to funding and staff numbers, the public spending watchdog has said. The National Audit Office said it remains unclear how the authorities will meet aims for improving prisoners’ mental health or get value for money because of a lack of relevant data. Auditors said that self-harm incidents increased by 73% between 2012 and 2016 to 40,161, while the 120 self-inflicted deaths in prison in 2016 was the highest figure on record and almost double that for 2012.”
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