The campaign to eradicate Zika has trampled over women’s rights

The Conversation, 9 February 2017
Author: Pia Riggirozzi
“The delivery of health care programmes in Latin America should be anchored in an understanding of the inequalities, discrimination and power relations that prevent many people from accessing them. Governments should remember that they have legal and ethical obligations under international law to ensure the best possible provision of services for all.”
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Human rights violations in organ procurement practice in China

BMC Medical Ethics 2017 18:11
Authors: Norbert W. Paul, Arthur Caplan, Michael E. Shapiro, Charl Els, Kirk C. Allison, Huige Li
“Over 90% of the organs transplanted in China before 2010 were procured from prisoners. Although Chinese officials announced in December 2014 that the country would completely cease using organs harvested from prisoners, no regulatory adjustments or changes in China’s organ donation laws followed. As a result, the use of prisoner organs remains legal in China if consent is obtained.”
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Mr. Trump’s ‘Gag Rule’ Will Harm Global Health

NYT, 26 January 2017
Author: The Editorial Board
“With a single memorandum, President Trump may well have made it harder for health workers around the world to fight cancer, H.I.V., Zika and Ebola. The memorandum, signed on Monday, reinstates and expands a policy barring health organizations abroad, many of which provide an array of services, from receiving federal funds if they even talk to women about abortion as a method of family planning.”
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Dutch commit $10 million to replace lost U.S. abortion funding

Reuters, 28 January 2017
Author: Stephanie van den Berg
“The Netherlands has committed $10 million for an initiative to replace funding for abortion services in developing countries that will be lost due to U.S. President Donald Trump’s ban on financing foreign groups that provide abortions.”
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Why doctors need to speak out against female genital cutting in India

The BMJ Blog, 20 January 2017
Author: Aarefa Johari
“What is a doctor’s responsibility, then, in the face of such a ritual? Two of the most basic pillars of medical ethics are to do no harm and to act in the best interests of a patient. Female circumcision has no health benefits and can potentially harm girls and women. For a patient, it serves no scientific or medical interest. In fact, since khatna is not a medical procedure at all, girls being brought to get cut can hardly be called patients. Besides, a seven-year-old is not capable of giving informed consent to the procedure.”
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Revised CIOMS International Ethical Guidelines for Health-Related Research Involving Humans

JAMA. 2017; 317(2):135-136
Authors: Johannes J. M. van Delden, Rieke van der Graaf
“CIOMS recently released a new version of its International Ethical Guidelines for Health-Related Research Involving Humans. These guidelines were developed in collaboration with WHO and based on authoritative ethical guidance documents, such as the World Medical Association’s Declaration of Helsinki and UNESCO’s Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights. The aim of the guidelines is to provide internationally vetted ethical principles and detailed commentary on how these principles should be applied, with particular attention to conducting research in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs).”
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Egypt busts organ trading racket, arrests 45 people

Reuters, 6 December 2016
Author: Mahmoud Mourad, Lin Noueihed
“Egypt has uncovered a network accused of illicit international trafficking in human organs, arresting 45 people and recovering millions of dollars in a dawn raid on Tuesday, the health ministry said. Among those held were doctors, nurses, middlemen and organ-buyers, involved in what the ministry described as the largest organ-trafficking network exposed in Egypt to date.”
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U.N. Apologizes for Role in Haiti’s 2010 Cholera Outbreak

NYT, 1 December 2016
Author: Somini Sengupta
“After six years and 10,000 deaths, the United Nations issued a carefully worded public apology on Thursday for its role in the 2010 cholera outbreak in Haiti and the widespread suffering it has caused since then. The mea culpa was an implicit acknowledgment that cholera was not present in Haiti until United Nations peacekeepers arrived in the country from Nepal, where a cholera outbreak was underway.”
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India at WTO: Takes strong stand to save generic drugs industry, calls for transparent health assessment

First Post, 12 November 2016
Author: Shreerupa Mitra-Jha
“Governments engaged in bilateral and regional trade investments should ensure that these agreements do not include provisions that impinge on the right to health, and as a first step should undertake public health assessments “that are transparent and made publicly available”, India said in a strong statement delivered at the WTO highlighting a longstanding fight by India to sustain its generic drugs industry.”
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Medical care and social justice in the jungles of Myanmar

The Lancet, 2016, 388 (10058), p2345–2347
Author: Timothy Holtz
“The past year was the worst year for displacement since World War 2. In 2015 alone, according to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, there were an estimated 12·4 million newly displaced individuals, including 8·6 million internally displaced people (IDPs) and 1·8 million refugees, quadrupling the number of newly displaced people in just 4 years. The sudden and urgent plight of persons from Syria caught up in a civil war is well known, but for more than 60 years the ethnic Kayin (Karen) in eastern Myanmar (Burma) have been enduring human rights violations, oppression, and displacement in their long struggle for human rights and autonomy.”
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