Sinopoli v Harrison (Human Rights) [2017] VCAT 355 (10 March 2017)

Date of order: 10 March 2017
“Applicant claims that in the delivery of services and in withdrawing services the Respondents unlawfully discriminated against her and victimised her – Applicant directed to produce all her evidence – Respondents then applied for claim to be struck out or dismissed – dismissal appropriate if claim is obviously hopeless or unsustainable – Tribunal’s approach is cautious – insufficient evidence to establish on balance of probabilities that Respondents victimised or unlawfully discriminated against Applicant – other issues raised by the Applicant not covered by the relevant legislation – outside jurisdiction – Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal Act 1998 s75 – Equal Opportunity Act 2010 ss 6,7,8,9,103,104.”
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WHO issues ethics guidance to protect rights of TB patients

WHO, 22 March 2017
“New tuberculosis (TB) ethics guidance, launched today by the World Health Organization (WHO), aims to help ensure that countries implementing the End TB Strategy adhere to sound ethical standards to protect the rights of all those affected.”
Find news release here.

Lawmakers Want To Start Crowdfunding Rape Kit Tests

Forbes, 22 March 2017
Author: Janet Burns
“In response to nationwide backlogs and budgetary woes, state legislators are turning to residents to ensure the cost of testing ‘rape kits’ won’t prevent victims from finding justice. Two bills now working their way through state congresses, the idea of legally facilitated crowdfunding to help reduce evidence backlogs is already seeing bipartisan support.”
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Treat HIV as a public health matter, not a criminal one

Sfchronicle, 20 March 2017
Author: The San Francisco Chronicle
“Treatment of HIV, the virus that leads to AIDS, has grown by leaps and bounds since the epidemic was at its height in the late 1980s and early 1990s. It’s time for our state law regarding the disease to evolve, too. A bill, SB239, has been introduced that would reduce these penalties to the status of a misdemeanor. The idea is to reduce the stigma and public health problems around HIV by treating it the same way, legally, as other communicable diseases.”
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‘Do no harm’ vs. ‘legitimate use of force’

EurekAlert, 16 March 2017
Source: University of Montreal
“Should a military doctor obey an order to not treat an enemy combatant? Or certify a sick soldier as fit to fight? Should a nurse take part in interrogations? Ride along on medical caravans to build trust with locals? Violate patient privacy for military ends? These and other questions are being studied by Canadian researchers with the Ethics in Military Medicine Research Group. Their latest paper, published in December in the winter issue of the Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics, compares the ethics codes of the Canadian Medical Association and the Department of National Defence and the Canadian Armed Forces. ”
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Study shows healthcare in Syria now a target of war

Reuters, 14 March 2017
Author: Kate Kelland
“The international community must do more to protect healthcare in Syria as medical services become targets of war, according to a study published in The Lancet medical journal on Tuesday. Published to mark the sixth anniversary of the Syrian crisis, the study used data from multiple sources to assess the conflict’s impact on health care and health workers. Researchers said there were almost 200 attacks on health centers last year alone and said a key feature of the weaponisation of healthcare is the repeated targeting of medical facilities with the aim of shutting them down.”
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How Same-Sex Marriage Laws Help LGBTQ Teens

HealthLine, 28 February 2017
Author: Gigen Mammoser
“Suicide is the second leading cause of death for people between the ages of 15 and 24 in the United States. However, adolescents who identify as gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgender are at even greater risk of self-harm. According to a new study published in JAMA Pediatrics, same-sex marriage legalization leads to an overall decrease in adolescent suicide attempts.”
Find article here.

The campaign to eradicate Zika has trampled over women’s rights

The Conversation, 9 February 2017
Author: Pia Riggirozzi
“The delivery of health care programmes in Latin America should be anchored in an understanding of the inequalities, discrimination and power relations that prevent many people from accessing them. Governments should remember that they have legal and ethical obligations under international law to ensure the best possible provision of services for all.”
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Human rights violations in organ procurement practice in China

BMC Medical Ethics 2017 18:11
Authors: Norbert W. Paul, Arthur Caplan, Michael E. Shapiro, Charl Els, Kirk C. Allison, Huige Li
“Over 90% of the organs transplanted in China before 2010 were procured from prisoners. Although Chinese officials announced in December 2014 that the country would completely cease using organs harvested from prisoners, no regulatory adjustments or changes in China’s organ donation laws followed. As a result, the use of prisoner organs remains legal in China if consent is obtained.”
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Mother wins right to challenge prosecution for buying abortion pills in Northern Ireland

BMJ 2017; 356:j527
Author: Clare Dyer
“A mother who faces criminal charges in Northern Ireland for procuring abortion pills over the internet for her 15 year old daughter has won permission from the High Court to challenge the prosecution as a breach of human rights.”
Find article here.