Written versus verbal consent: a qualitative study of stakeholder views of consent procedures used at the time of recruitment into a peripartum trial conducted in an emergency setting

BMC Medical Ethics 2017 18:36
Authors: J. Lawton, N. Hallowell, C. Snowdon, J. E. Norman, K. Carruthers, F. C. Denison
“Obtaining prospective written consent from women to participate in trials when they are experiencing an obstetric emergency is challenging. Alternative consent pathways, such as gaining verbal consent at enrolment followed, later, by obtaining written consent, have been advocated by some clinicians and bioethicists but have received little empirical attention.”
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How do we choose who gets the flu vaccine in a pandemic – paramedics, prisoners or the public?

The Conversation, 24 May 2017
Author: Connal Lee
“Ideally, everyone who needs to be immunised against influenza has access to the flu vaccine. But in a pandemic, initially there will be more people needing protection than there are doses. The potential impact of a pandemic is difficult to predict. In a pandemic, vaccines may not be available immediately and could take four to six months to produce. Once available, difficult distribution decisions arise. So how do authorities decide who to vaccinate first? Is it based on who’s most vulnerable? Who would benefit most? Or are other factors at play?”
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Personal factors affecting ethical performance in healthcare workers during disasters and mass casualty incidents in Iran: a qualitative study

Med Health Care and Philos (2017). doi:10.1007/s11019-017-9752-7
Authors: Mehrzad Kiani, Mohsen Fadavi, Hamidreza Khankeh, Fariba Borhani
“In emergencies and disasters, ethics are affected by both personal and organizational factors. Given the lack of organizational ethical guidelines in the disaster management system in Iran, the present study was conducted to explain the personal factors affecting ethics and ethical behaviors among disaster healthcare workers.”
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One third of ICU doctors bullied, survey finds, prompting crackdown by College of Intensive Care Medicine

SMH, 29 January 2017
Author: Kate Aubusson
“The College of Intensive Care and Medicine (CICM) has moved to stamp out bullying, discrimination and harassment in ICUs. The college surveyed almost 1000 fellows and trainees and found one third reported being bullied in the past two years. A total of 12 per cent report they had experienced discrimination and 3 per cent reporting being sexually harassed.”
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Staff shortages force surgeons to use ‘sticky tape’ to fix surgical instruments

SMH, 14 December 2016
Author: Anna Patty
“Senior surgeons say they are using “sticky tape” to fix surgical instruments during operations because of shortages of staff and equipment at Sydney’s busy Prince of Wales complex of hospitals. A litany of failures in the efficient supply of sterile equipment that works is outlined by a senior surgeon and in a confidential internal review.”
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Doctors were under ‘political pressure’ in asylum seeker care, inquest hears

The Age, 29 November 2016
Source: AAP
“Doctors were under “political pressure” not to bring critically ill asylum seekers from Manus Island to Australia for medical treatment, an inquest has heard. A Brisbane inquest into the death of Iranian asylum seeker Hamid Kehazaei has heard evidence there are “levels of bureaucracy” surrounding urgent hospital transfers.”
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The Intensive Care Lifeboat: a survey of lay attitudes to rationing dilemmas in neonatal intensive care

BMC Medical Ethics 2016 17:69
Authors: C. Arora, J. Savulescu, H. Maslen, M. Selgelid, D. Wilkinson
“Resuscitation and treatment of critically ill newborn infants is associated with relatively high mortality, morbidity and cost. Guidelines relating to resuscitation have traditionally focused on the best interests of infants. There are, however, limited resources available in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), meaning that difficult decisions sometimes need to be made. This study explores the intuitions of lay people (non-health professionals) regarding resource allocation decisions in the NICU.”
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Research in disaster settings: a systematic qualitative review of ethical guidelines

BMC Medical Ethics 2016 17:62
Authors: Signe Mezinska, Péter Kakuk, Goran Mijaljica, Marcin Waligóra and Dónal P. O’Mathúna
“Conducting research during or in the aftermath of disasters poses many specific practical and ethical challenges. This is particularly the case with research involving human subjects. The extraordinary circumstances of research conducted in disaster settings require appropriate regulations to ensure the protection of human participants. The goal of this study is to systematically and qualitatively review the existing ethical guidelines for disaster research by using the constant comparative method (CCM).”
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‘Cancer hotels’ house China’s patient refugees

Reuters, 29 September 2016
Author: Kim Kyung Hoon
“In the shadow of one of China’s top cancer hospitals in Beijing, a catacomb-like network of ramshackle brick buildings has become a home-from-home for hundreds of cancer patients and their families waiting for treatment. The financial burden for Chinese patients with serious conditions like cancer or diabetes can be overwhelming. Official data shows that up to 44 percent of families pushed into poverty were impoverished by illness.”
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Bankstown-Lidcombe Hospital medical gases incident

NSW Health, 26 August 2016
Prepared by the Chief Health Officer
“Final report for Health in relation to critical incidents that occurred at Bankstown-Lidcombe Hospital in June and July 2016: dispensing incorrect gas to two neonates through a neonatal resuscitaire in Operating Theatre 8.”
Find report here.