CEU v University of Technology Sydney [2017] NSWCATAD 79

Decision date: 13 March 2017
“ADMINISTRATIVE LAW – Health Privacy Principles 2, 9 and 11 of the Health Records and Information Protection Act 2003 – whether provision of health information by one administrative unit of an agency to another constitutes ‘disclosure’ – whether diagnosis of alcohol dependence accurate – whether applicant’s diary collected by agency – whether notes collected were irrelevant, excessive, inaccurate or unreasonably intrusive – whether health information disclosed as alleged on 21 May 2015 – meaning of ‘disclosure’ in Health Privacy Principle 11.”
Find decision here.

26 years ago the UK signed up to formula milk advertising rules – so why isn’t it law yet?

The Conversation, 22 March 2017
Author: Aimee Grant
“Like the topic of infant feeding itself, public health bills can be a minefield. Ask any mum or dad and they will tell you that parenting media in the UK is flooded with potentially misleading advertising for certain formula products. Although, NHS tells mothers that babies who are fed first infant formula need nothing more than that, there is still a wide range of “follow on” formulas available for babies over six months old. So why do manufacturers make these products, and advertise their “health benefits” if children don’t need them?”
Find article here.

Australians’ attitudes to vaccination are more complex than a simple ‘pro’ or ‘anti’ label

The Conversation, 9 March 2017
Authors: Julie Leask, Margie Danchin and Nina J Berry
“Reading the headlines, it would be easy to believe childhood vaccination rates are declining in Australia, due to an increasing trend towards distrust of vaccines among parents. In fact, vaccination rates in Australia have been high and stable, hovering between 91% and 93% since 2003. Among the 7% of children who are not or not fully vaccinated across Australia, more than half have been prevented from accessing vaccination by some practical barrier. Although the numbers are small, there are good reasons to be concerned about parents who don’t vaccinate their children, or who delay getting their children’s vaccinations.”
Find article here.

The fierce urgency of addressing language, literacy care barriers

AMA Wire, 7 March 2017
Author: Kevin B. O’Reilly
“In the absence of a qualified interpreter, patients with limited English proficiency (LEP) can have trouble conveying critical information about symptoms and experiences. Offering reliable access to quality language and interpretive services is one strategy for improving cross-cultural communication in health care organizations. This is one pathway to quality care and shared decision-making, which some argue is not only an urgent priority, but also a clinical, legal and ethical obligation.”
Find article here.

How We Are Manipulated To Believe New Is Better When It Comes To Our Health

Forbes, 2 March 2017
Author: Robert Pearl
“What struck me was that neither medical device story presented convincing evidence that the product would make a real difference in outcomes for patients. Yet both medical devices were backed by investors with billion-dollar expectations. The applications were clever, but the promises made and the media coverage provided far surpassed what the research demonstrated.”
Find article here.

Betraying the oath: the rot in India’s medical education system

The Hindu, 25 February 2017
Author: Vidya Krishnan
“The Medical Council of India recently barred 32 colleges across the country. Vidya Krishnan reconstructs how one of those, a Bhopal institute, marshalled doctors on hire, fake patients and life-saving equipment on rent for inspection day.”
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Appeal Court overturns first case based on ruling that patients have right to information on treatment options

BMJ 2017; 356: j992
Author: Clare Dyer
“A pregnant woman was entitled to be told about research indicating that there were risks to her fetus in delaying labour, the Court of Appeal has ruled in an important judgment on patients’ right to information.The three Appeal Court judges held that Burton Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust was liable for the serious brain damage suffered by Sebastian Webster as a result of his late delivery 14 years ago, reversing a High Court judgment in favour of the trust.”
Find article here.

FDA issues draft guidance to better medical product labeling

Reuters, 18 Janauary 2017
Author: Divya Grover
“The U.S. health regulator issued draft guidance, recommending ways to communicate promotional materials and additional information that is not on the label of medical products. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration typically determines what information goes on the labels of medical drugs and devices, after evaluating whether the product is safe and effective for the proposed indication. Drugmakers have long wanted to communicate supplementary information that isn’t on the label, but which concerns the cleared use of the product.”
Find article here.

Doctors Want To Learn More About Treating Transgender Patients, Survey Shows

Huffington Post, 12 January 2017
Author: Anna Almendrala
“One in three transgender patients reports experiencing serious discrimination or bias when seeking medical care, even when that care is unrelated to their transgender status. While some of these negative interactions in health care may stem from discriminatory attitudes on the part of medical care professionals, a survey reveals that doctors feel they lack the training they need to feel confident when treating transgender patients.”
Find article here.