Trump Seeks Delay of Ruling on Health Law Subsidies, Prolonging Uncertainty

NYT, 22 May 2017
Author: Robert Pear
“The Trump administration asked a federal appeals court on Monday to delay ruling on a lawsuit that could determine whether the government will continue paying subsidies under the Affordable Care Act to health insurance companies for the benefit of low-income people — effectively prolonging uncertainty that is already rattling the health law.”
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The Voluntary Nature of Decision-Making in Addiction: Static Metaphysical Views Versus Epistemologically Dynamic Views

Bioethics, 31: 349–359. 2017. doi:10.1111/bioe.12356
Authors: Racine, E. and Rousseau-Lesage, S.
“The degree of autonomy present in the choices made by individuals with an addiction, notably in the context of research, is unclear and debated. Some have argued that addiction, as it is commonly understood, prevents people from having sufficient decision-making capacity or self-control to engage in choices involving substances to which they have an addiction. Others have criticized this position for being too radical and have counter-argued in favour of the full autonomy of people with an addiction. Aligning ourselves with middle-ground positions between these two extremes, we flesh out an account of voluntary action that makes room for finer-grained analyses than the proposed all-or-nothing stances, which rely on a rather static metaphysical understanding of the nature of the voluntariness of action.”
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Canada eases steps to open supervised drug injection sites amid opioid crisis

The Guardian, 21 May 2017
Author: Ashifa Kassam
“Canada’s government has made it easier to open supervised drug injection sites across the country, offering communities a lifeline as they battle an opioid crisis that has claimed thousands of lives in recent years. New legislation passed this week streamlines the more than two dozen requirements previously needed to launch these facilities, which offer a medically supervised space and sterile equipment for people who use drugs intravenously.”
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Some Social Scientists Are Tired of Asking for Permission

NYT, 22 May 2017
Author: Kate Murphy
“Who gets to decide whether the experimental protocol — what subjects are asked to do and disclose — is appropriate and ethical? That question has been roiling the academic community since the Department of Health and Human Services’s Office for Human Research Protections revised its rules in January.”
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Hobson v Northern Sydney Local Health District [2017] NSWSC 589

Decision date: 17 May 2017
“NEGLIGENCE – medical negligence – where plaintiff with Noonan Syndrome rendered paraplegic in surgery to correct spinal deformity and associated respiratory difficulties – where plaintiff’s intraoperative condition deteriorated significantly – where operation halted but not before the plaintiff suffered a spinal stroke that led to paraplegia – whether operation should have been abandoned before this occurred – whether reasonable to continue with operation having regard to plaintiff’s pre-operative condition – whether operation should have been abandoned when spinal monitoring became ineffective following administration of vecuronium to assist ventilation.”
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Health Care Complaints Commission v Kennedy [2017] NSWCATOD 72

Decision date: 16 May 2017
“PROFESSIONS AND TRADES –— health practitioner — whether conduct particularised amounts to “improper and unethical” conduct — whether conduct admitted or found proven amounts to professional misconduct — appropriate protective orders practitioner found guilty of professional misconduct.”
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Health Care Complaints Commission v Saedlounia (No. 2) [2017] NSWCATOD 77

Decision date: 18 May 2017
“Unsatisfactory professional conduct – professional misconduct – medical practitioner no longer registered – Tribunal would have cancelled registration for two years if registered – practitioner disqualified from registration for two years.”
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EU probes Aspen price gouging allegations

PharmaPhorum, 16 May 2017
Author: Richard Staines
“The European Commission is to investigate into whether South Africa’s Aspen abused a dominant market position by raising the price of a group of generic cancer drugs. Pharma pricing is already under scrutiny in the US, where president Trump has vowed to take action against high drug prices. But now authorities across the Atlantic are also concerned over so-called “price gouging”, where companies impose significant price rises for badly needed drugs.”
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