2 Couples Sue After Children Are Born With Genetic Abnormality Traced Back to Donated Eggs

Time, 16 November 2017
Author: David Klepper
“Two couples are suing a New York fertility doctor and his clinic after giving birth to children with a genetic abnormality later traced back to donated eggs. The two children, both born in 2009, have Fragile X syndrome, a genetic condition that can lead to intellectual and developmental impairments. The parents, identified by initials and last names in legal papers, argue the doctor and the clinic failed to test the women who donated the eggs to determine whether they were carriers for Fragile X. They’re seeking damages for the added expenses of raising a disabled child.”
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Parents reach settlement with IVF clinic after sons were born with genetic condition Fragile X syndrome

SMH,13 November 2017
Source: AAP
“The parents of two boys with an intellectual disability say they can move on with their lives after reaching a settlement with a Sydney IVF clinic. Leighee Eastbury sued Australian IVF provider Genea, formerly known as Sydney IVF, after failing identify she was a carrier of the Fragile X syndrome.”
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The right to know versus the right to privacy: donor anonymity and the Assisted Reproductive Treatment Amendment Act 2016 (Vic)

Med J Aust 2017; 207 (9): 377-378.
Author: Xavier Symons
“Recent Victorian legislation is ethically defensible but will need to be closely monitored. On 1 March 2017, the Assisted Reproductive Treatment Amendment Act 2016 (Vic) came into effect, allowing for the retrospective release of anonymous donor information to donor-conceived children. The legislation, an Australian first, allows donor children to know the name, date of birth, ethnicity, physical characteristics, genetic conditions and donor code of their donor parents, even where anonymity has been requested.”
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Legislation opens can of worms for gamete donors

MJA Insight, 43(6), 6 November 2017
Author: Cate Swannell
“Victorian legislation allowing donor offspring to have the identifying details of their previously anonymous biological parent is an imperfect solution to a “genuine ethical dilemma” and needs “rigorous monitoring and review”, according to experts.”
Find article here.

 

Bioethicists raise alarm about conflicts of interest in Australia’s IVF industry

SMH, 2 November 2017
Author: Esther Han
“A team of Australian bioethicists has found that conflicts of interest are leading to fertility doctors making decisions that financially benefit them and their employer, at the expense of their patients.”
Find article here.

Let us talk about eggs! Professional resistance to elective egg vitrification and gendered medical paternalism

Med Health Care and Philos (2017), p1-13
Authors: Judit Sándor, Lilla Vicsek, Zsófia Bauer
“In this paper, by applying a feminist bioethical perspective, we identify a new form of medical paternalism that still shapes contemporary legal policies on human egg cryopreservation performed without medical reasons. The fear of negligent, careless women who opt to delay their pregnancy for mere convenience is a widely known gender biased stereotype. Nevertheless, the opinions and judgments of medical professionals on this issue have not yet been sufficiently explored by in-depth research. In this essay, therefore, first we look at the broader bioethical, legal, and social aspects of human egg cryopreservation. In the second part of the paper we discuss a unique qualitative study conducted with professionals working at Hungarian IVF clinics.”
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NHMRC releases updated assisted reproductive technology guidelines

NHMRC, 20 April 2017
“The National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) today released the Ethical guidelines on the use of assisted reproductive technology in clinical practice and research, 2017 (ART guidelines). This update replaces the 2007 ART guidelines and provides contemporary ethical guidance for the conduct of ART in the clinical setting. The ART guidelines articulate ethical principles and, when read in conjunction with federal and state or territory legislation, create a robust framework for the conduct of ART in Australia.”
Find media release and guideline here.

Unconventional combinations of prospective parents: ethical challenges faced by IVF providers

BMC Medical Ethics, 2017, 18:18
Author: Robert Klitzman
“Professional guidelines have addressed ethical dilemmas posed by a few types of nontraditional procreative arrangements (e.g., gamete donations between family members), but many questions arise regarding how providers view and make decisions about these and other such arrangements.”
Find article here.