Not Just About Consent: The Ethical Dimensions of Research Methodology Knowledge in IRBs

JME Blog, 15 June 2017
Author: Sarah Wieten
“The recent article, “Some Social Scientists Are Tired of Asking for Permission” in the New York Times inspired a great deal of debate about the role of institutional research ethics board (IRB) oversight in social science, which some argue is in most cases unlikely to involve significant harm to participants.”
Find article here.

 

What’s the Point of Professional Ethical Codes?

JME Blog, 13 June 2017
Author: Iain Brassington
“They can’t be meant as a particularly useful tool for solving deep moral dilemmas: they’re much too blunt for that, often presuppose too much, and tend to bend to suit the law. To think that because the relevant professional code enjoins x it follows that x is permissible or right smacks of a simple appeal to authority, and this flies in the face of what it is to be a moral agent in the first place. But what a professional code of ethics may do is to provide a certain kind of Bolamesque legal defence: if your having done ? attracts a claim that it’s negligent or unreasonable or something like that, being able to point out that your professional body endorses ?-ing will help you out. But professional ethics, and what counts as professional discipline, stretches way beyond that.”
Find article here.

Nurses should not participate in executions by lethal injection

The Conversation, 21 February 2017
Author: Roger Watson
“In some US states, prisoners condemned to die are killed using lethal injections. This takes place in two steps which make the prisoner unconscious and then stop breathing. Nurses are often present, but do they really need to be present? A group of senior nurses from the UK, Australia and the US recently debated this issue. They concluded that, unfortunately, the international nursing codes of ethics lacks sufficient detail to be helpful to nurses faced with the decision to take part, or not, in an execution.”
Find article here.

A New Day For Oversight Of Human Subjects Research

Health Affairs Blog, 6 February 2017
Author: Holly Fernandez Lynch
“On January 19, 2017—President Obama’s last day in office—the Federal Register published a Final Rule to amend the Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects, the set of regulations applicable to most human subjects research conducted or supported with federal funds, and more typically referred to as the “Common Rule.” This rule change had been a long time coming, with an Advance Notice of Proposed Rule Making (ANPRM) published in July 2011 and a Notice of Proposed Rule Making (NPRM) published in September 2015. The seriousness of its impact on the research community, patients, and the public is evidenced by the more than 3,300 public comments submitted during the rulemaking process. So what changed?”
Find article here.

Revised CIOMS International Ethical Guidelines for Health-Related Research Involving Humans

JAMA. 2017; 317(2):135-136
Authors: Johannes J. M. van Delden, Rieke van der Graaf
“CIOMS recently released a new version of its International Ethical Guidelines for Health-Related Research Involving Humans. These guidelines were developed in collaboration with WHO and based on authoritative ethical guidance documents, such as the World Medical Association’s Declaration of Helsinki and UNESCO’s Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights. The aim of the guidelines is to provide internationally vetted ethical principles and detailed commentary on how these principles should be applied, with particular attention to conducting research in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs).”
Find article here.

Towards a European code of medical ethics. Ethical and legal issues

J Med Ethics 2017;43:41-46
Authors: Sara Patuzzo, Elisabetta Pulice
“The feasibility of a common European code of medical ethics is discussed, with consideration and evaluation of the difficulties such a project is going to face, from both the legal and ethical points of view. On the one hand, the analysis will underline the limits of a common European code of medical ethics as an instrument for harmonising national professional rules in the European context; on the other hand, we will highlight some of the potentials of this project, which could be increased and strengthened through a proper rulemaking process and through adequate and careful choice of content.”
Find article here.

Public Consultation on Section 3 (Chapters 3.1 & 3.5), Glossary and Revisions to Section 5 National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research, 2007

Public consultation closes Wednesday 21 December 2016
“The National Health Medical Research Council (NHMRC) is proposing a revision of Section 3 of the National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research 2007 (the National Statement).”
Make a submission here.