Cybersecurity Concerns and Medical Devices: Lessons From a Pacemaker Advisory

JAMA. 2017; 318(21): 2077-2078.
Authors: Daniel B. Kramer, Kevin Fu
“Medical devices increasingly include capabilities for wireless communication and remote monitoring systems that relay clinical information from patients to clinicians. For example, many cardiac implantable electrical devices can transmit data regarding arrhythmia burden and heart failure metrics with minimal patient effort. This technology can improve patient care, but also introduces possible risks to data security and patient safety.”
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Controversial pelvic mesh devices banned in Australia by medical watchdog

SMH, 30 November 2017
Author: Ebony Bowden
“Vaginal mesh is to be banned in Australia after the medical regulator found the risk posed to patients by the device outweighed any benefits.The Therapeutic Goods Administration announced the ban this week after an investigation which followed widespread complaints from women who said the implants left them in debilitating pain.”
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Ethical aspects of brain computer interfaces: a scoping review

BMC Medical Ethics 2017 18:60
Authors: Sasha Burwell, Matthew Sample, Eric Racine
“Brain-Computer Interface (BCI) is a set of technologies that are of increasing interest to researchers. BCI has been proposed as assistive technology for individuals who are non-communicative or paralyzed, such as those with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis or spinal cord injury. The technology has also been suggested for enhancement and entertainment uses, and there are companies currently marketing BCI devices for those purposes (e.g., gaming) as well as health-related purposes (e.g., communication). The unprecedented direct connection created by BCI between human brains and computer hardware raises various ethical, social, and legal challenges that merit further examination and discussion.”
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Doctors blame media for scaring patients off vaginal mesh implants

The Guardian, 6 October 2017
Author: Melissa Davey
“Inaccurate media reporting about vaginal mesh implants and the lawsuits associated with them has caused patients to become fearful of mesh procedures that may be essential to improving their health, New Zealand general surgeon Dr Steven Kelly says.”
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Vaginal mesh scandal: women don’t need body-shaming on top of their pain

The Guardian, 1 October 2017
Author: Barbara Ellen
“The ongoing vaginal mesh implant scandal is a complex affair, with group lawsuits erupting all around the world, including the US, the UK and Australia. Last week, Johnson & Johnson’s Ethicon unit was ordered to pay a record $57m in damages to a woman called Ella Ebaugh. The J&J implant, launched without a clinical trial, is still marketed, often in cases involving traumatic births, years after it was known to cause appalling problems to women such as Ebaugh, including intense pelvic pain and torn bladders and vaginas, leading to agonising sex and incontinence.”
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Direct-to-Consumer Medical Testing in the Era of Value-Based Care

JAMA. 2017; 317(24): 2485-2486.
Author: Kimberly Lovett Rockwell
“This Viewpoint documents the growing market share of direct-to-consumer (DTC) medical testing despite growing recognition that it represents low-value or harmful care and proposes policy options to increase accountability and protect patients from adverse consequences of DTC testing.”
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