GMC to push for erasure of paediatrician convicted of manslaughter

BMJ 2017; 359: j5223
Author: Clare Dyer
“The General Medical Council is to press ahead with an appeal in the High Court against what it considers a too lenient regulatory sanction on a paediatrician convicted of gross negligence manslaughter, despite a letter signed by more than 100 doctors urging the GMC to reconsider.”
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Australia’s health watchdog accused of ‘too close’ relationship with industry

SMH, 5 November 2017
Author: Joanne McCarthy
“Australia’s drug and medical device watchdog, the Therapeutic Goods Administration, needs a complete overhaul to distance it from the health industry and allow consumers to sue it for negligence, say academics and consumer advocates after the regulator quietly announced moves to classify all pelvic mesh devices high risk after years of controversy.”
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The global abortion policies database—legal knowledge as a health intervention

The BMJ Opinion, 1 November 2017
Author: Joanna Erdman
“In 2012, Savita Halappanavar died in an Irish hospital from miscarriage complications after being refused an abortion. The treating physicians believed that because the fetus still had a beating heart their “hands were tied.” Under Irish law, abortion is a criminal offence unless necessary to save the life of the pregnant woman, yet there is little clarity on this exception. Following nationwide protests, the government introduced the Protection of Life During Pregnancy Act 2013 to clarify the law and to regulate access under it. Years earlier, the European Court of Human Rights called for precisely such regulation moved by the impossible position of physicians who “faced criminal charges, on the one hand, and an absence of clear legal, ethical, or medical guidelines, on the other.”
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De-doctoring medicine via another layer of bureaucracy

MJA Insight, 30 October 2017
Author: Aniello Iannuzzi
“The draft report of the Independent Review of Accreditation Systems within the National Registration and Accreditation Scheme (NRAS) for health professions has been released and it proposes massive changes, and is not to be glossed over.”
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Euthanasia: an emphatic no from this GP

MJA Insight, 30 October 2017
Author: Jane Barker
“What troubles me is that I feel that there is a presumption that euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide (PAS) are a doctor’s role – indeed, could it morally, ethically and legally be performed by any other professional? – but that somehow the question of whether we would want to play this role and how it should be regulated has not been fully discussed with us.”
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The deadly business of an unregulated global stem cell industry

Journal of Medical Ethics 2017;43:744-746.
Authors: Lysaght T, Lipworth W, Hendl T, et al.
“In 2016, the Office of the State Coroner of New South Wales released its report into the death of an Australian woman, Sheila Drysdale, who had died from complications of an autologous stem cell procedure at a Sydney clinic. In this report, we argue that Mrs Drysdale’s death was avoidable, and it was the result of a pernicious global problem of an industry exploiting regulatory systems to sell unproven and unjustified interventions with stem cells.”
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Firearm Surrender Laws: Prompting Promise for Women’s Health

Ann Intern Med. 2017;167(8):591-592
Authors: Joslyn Fisher, Amy Bonomi
“Homicide is a leading cause of death in women of childbearing age. Further, more than half of female homicides with a known perpetrator are committed by a current or former intimate partner. Firearm access in the home exacerbates the risk for homicide by an intimate partner. Although federal legislation, such as the Violence Against Women Act, restricts domestic abusers’ access to firearms, state and local implementation of these regulations is highly variable.”
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Newly controversial opioid enforcement law under fire

The Hill, 17 October 2017
Author: Rachel Roubein
“Several lawmakers are pushing to repeal or revisit a law critics say enables the flow of deadly and addictive opioids, hours after President Trump’s drug czar nominee withdrew his name amid the controversy.”
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Australian-first with corporation fined $127,500 for unlawful advertising

AHPRA, 4 October 2017
“In an Australian-first, Wellness Enterprises Pty Limited, which traded as Australian Male Hormone Clinic, has been fined $127,500 plus costs after being found guilty and convicted of 17 charges related to unlawful advertising of regulated health services.”
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The United Kingdom Sets Limits on Experimental Treatments: The Case of Charlie Gard

JAMA. 2017;318(11):1001-1002
Author: Robert D. Truog
“The case of Charlie Gard in London, England, has been the focus of international attention, generating polarized views about the use of experimental treatments. On one side are those who hold that patients should be able to purchase whatever treatments they desire and can afford; on the other are those who maintain that governments must play a regulatory role in protecting patients from harm and that unproven therapies must meet a threshold of scientific validity before they are offered, regardless of the ability of the patient to pay.”
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